Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

Hacked By AdGhosT

Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

My country » The Peking Duck

My country

I know, the story and the photo and the video are everywhere. But I have to express my horror.

A friend in China tells me CCTV is playing this again and again, and I don’t blame them. They want to make the US look bad, and in this case they don’t have to try very bad; the US hasn’t looked this awful since Abu Ghraib. Heads should roll over this atrocity.

______________

Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 115 Comments

This is sad and hilarious at the same time. I shake my head, I really do.

November 24, 2011 @ 8:17 am | Comment

Indeed, Cheungsie is sad and hilarious at the same time. Amusing retardation combined with a tragic misunderstanding of the world outside his mother’s basement.

November 24, 2011 @ 8:24 am | Comment

I shake my head, I really do.

Typical anglo-saxon self-righteous response. When they lose the argument they ‘shake their head’ and don’t respond. By shaking their head they try and claim the moral high ground because they possess some truth that is so obvious that others can’t get it.

I’ve seen that from white people time and time again.

November 24, 2011 @ 8:33 am | Comment

”primarily available to US citizens, perhaps. It should be no surprise that the US government serves US citizens, first and foremost”
In response to that exact line, you wrote this in #64:”So from the hard evidence it would appear that so-called ‘democracy’ does nothing in terms of reducing a regime’s penchant for interfering in all corners of the world and being a general global bully.”
To which I responded thusly in #78:”Having misgivings about US foreign policy does not logically lead to disavowing democracy as a system of governance for China.”

Because A does not lead to B (undesirable outcome)it abviously does not follow that because of B we should not have A. Nor does it follow that B causes A.

So your last statement in responding to me is not really a response because it responds to something I never said nor implied. I have misgivings about your so called ‘democracy’ for other reasons which I have outlined above.

November 24, 2011 @ 8:37 am | Comment

“Nor does it follow that B causes A”. should have been “nor does it follow that B is causally linked to A”

November 24, 2011 @ 8:40 am | Comment

I don’t think Lisa is Anglo-Saxon, but Italian if I remember correctly.

November 24, 2011 @ 10:34 am | Comment

Wayne
If the Han were Anglo Saxons, the Tibetans and Uighurs and Mongolians would well have simply disappeared by now.

Look, you have a point here, but don’t go and mix me up with all those Anglo-Saxons above, okay.

To the point:
Obviously, you have not encountered the growing body of historical scholarship which documents the very progressive role the Mongolian empire played in facilitating East-West trade. Okay, those who failed to immediately capitulate experienced a bit of Genghis Khan tough love, but that was the standard of the day.

November 24, 2011 @ 10:48 am | Comment

Other Lisa – I’m with you there (and mine is an Italo-Austro-Anglo-Danish head to boot). Such utter drivel from our Chinese counterparts here really makes me think China will never amount to much.

November 24, 2011 @ 11:54 am | Comment

uch utter drivel from our Chinese counterparts here really makes me think China will never amount to much.

Good. Then you should not have too much to worry about then eh?

Just mind your own business. That’s all.

November 24, 2011 @ 12:06 pm | Comment

King Tubby
Look, you have a point here, but don’t go and mix me up with all those Anglo-Saxons above, okay.

They’d be even luckier if the Han were like Germans, right? Or maybe Romans, who enslaved just about 30-50% of every population they encountered?

Obviously, you have not encountered the growing body of historical scholarship which documents the very progressive role the Mongolian empire played in facilitating East-West trade.

China facilitated “East-West trade” for millennia before the Mongols came along. The whole reason why the Han dug in in Xinjiang after driving out the Huns was so they could trade with various Central Asian kingdoms, India, Persia and whichever Arab Caliphate was in power at the time. The Mongols helped expand this network by pretty much killing everyone in between.

Their actions are understandable given how tough Mongolia can be to live in (especially then) but it’s a stretch to say they were in any way benevolent.

November 24, 2011 @ 12:07 pm | Comment

Today may be my worst troll infestation ever. Should I just close all the threads?

November 24, 2011 @ 12:36 pm | Comment

To Wayne 94:
“you do have a rather literal minded take on things don’t you?”
—I have no interest in guessing what you think. So if you don’t flesh out your analogy, don’t complain about it after the fact. Next time, just make a better or more relevant analogy. Say what you mean, and mean what you say. Not that complicated.

“may require a little ‘authoritarianism’ to get the ball rolling. You would not rule such a country in the same way as a place like a developed country.”
—fine. China’s ball is rolling. She’s had a “little” 62 year stretch of authoritarianism and 30 years where things have actually been looking up. We’re not talking about whether China should’ve had democracy in 1949, or 1980. We’re talking about (realistically) some point in the future. Hopefully not too distant future.

To doggie #99:
“No one that earns $3,000 a year has any significant control over his own life in a democracy.”
—in the US, no. In China, better, because the comparative bar is lower. Though of course we know about the income gap and wealth gap, don’t we.

“If China became a “democracy” tomorrow they would instantly be taken by CCP influence and state-run corporations.”
—what makes you think a democratic CHina still has any uses for the vestiges of the CCP? How would they be “taken” by SOE’s? Heck, what makes you think they’d still be SOEs?

“And that’s the government you want to recommend?”
—man, if I had a nickel for every time you actually read, I’d be penniless. I’m not recommending the US government, or the Athenian government. I’d like to see that Chinese people get the government of their own choosing, with a system of governance of their own choosing. You think they need to be told precisely what to do, by the CCP. That, my good four-legged friend, is the difference.

To Wayne 104:
for fear of “misunderstanding” what you’re thinking, you’re going to have to express your argument in a way that doesn’t involve unassigned variables. What misgivings have you outlined about democracy where, besides your distaste for US foreign policy?

November 24, 2011 @ 2:11 pm | Comment

Richard, I had intended to add some thoughts about the UC-Davis video from a Law Enforcement standpoint – but it appears this comment thread has gone awry.

November 24, 2011 @ 4:07 pm | Comment

Goju, “awry” is an understatement. I apologize. I’ve been too busy to watch, except to put in an occasional comment lambasting my trolls. I am considering doing something to stop it, but I don’t want this forum to be only Euramerican.

November 25, 2011 @ 12:17 am | Comment

Thread closed. Please use the open thread above to say anything left unsaid.

November 25, 2011 @ 12:32 am | Comment

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