Tibet – Shangri-La on steroids

Somehow I missed this priceless column in The Global Times (and I thank this blogger for pointing it out).

This extraordinary travelogue tripe article by the former UN ambassador to Bolivia. After gushing over the joys of China liberating the Tibetans from serfdom and the shiny new infrastructure all Tibetans should be grateful for, the author really ramps up the propaganda:

I had a chance to talk to some educators in Tibet. I asked them about the language used in primary education, weary of the alleged loss of the Tibetan language in the formal education system. I was told the kids learn three languages: Tibetan, Chinese and English! I had thought my own children were something of a special case, as they have been learning French, Spanish and Finnish since they started schooling, but I realize these Tibetan kids will be as internationally literate as my children are, with all the same opportunities that will provide them in life.

…Then there was a family of herdsmen; being summer, they were living in their tent (and beside the tent there was a small solar panel for generating electricity enough for hot water, TV, and the lights in the evening), however they told us they already had a fix house in the village, where they would stay during the winter. And best of all: the government is subsidizing 30% of the new housing, which has been built in collaborative efforts by the villagers, and display the characteristics of the traditional Tibetan culture, both in terms of the materials used and the colorful decorations in the main rooms inside.

These houses are very bright, spacious and beautifully decorated. I saw several generations living there together. What I hadn’t realized before is that the life expectancy of a Tibetan used to be a mere 35 years – couldn’t see so many generations there together in the past – whereas now the life expectancy has doubled to 67 years. This is not only an impressive testament of the improvement of the human rights in Tibet during the past 50 years, but it also provides the old folks the opportunity to tell their grandchildren what life was like in the past. They will pass on the best of the Tibetan culture to their grandchildren, and they will also be able to tell how much life has improved since 1959!

Where’s my motion sickness bag?

Check out the very humorous comments to the blog post that led me to this puffiest of puff pieces. I don’t think I’ve ever seen every talking point about Tibet squeezed so neatly (and breathlessly) into a single vessel. It’s fitting that the blogger brings it up in the context of the Ask Alessandro columns; this one is nearly as funny.

For the record: I am not a Free Tibet groupie and I acknowledge the good China has done for Tibet, and the bad. Where I can never stop ragging on The Party is its dopey propaganda efforts to create a perception of modern-day Tibet that is nearly as ridiculous as the Western perceptions based on the James Hilton novel and the sentimental movie that followed it (and which, admittedly, I loved as a teenager; there’s no doubt these works of fiction helped put some serious stars in Americans’ eyes).

I was pretty random in my quote selection from the GT article. Do be sure to read it all.

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Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 38 Comments

Great find.

“… and they will also be able to tell how much life has improved since 1959!”

Only in a wet dream at Zhongnanhai.

The oppression, arrests, beatings, murders, and systematic marginalising of Tibetan language and culture are the first thing that Tibetan children will be taught by their parents – and no amount of propaganda-laden BS provided by Beijing’s educators is going to change that.

There’s only one ‘solution’ open to China’s leaders that would ‘finally’ succeed in removing the justified indignation and resentment of native Tibetans; and don’t believe for a second that it’s beyond them.

August 5, 2010 @ 9:37 am | Comment

I won’t say it’s quite that bad, Stuart, and your reference to the Final Solution is, I have to say, a bit dramatic, don’t you think? I believe there are plenty of Tibetans who are grateful for improvements in the quality of life and infrastructure. But resentment against perceived occupiers and oppressors simmers not too far under the surface, and we have plenty examples of how it can flare up at any time.

August 5, 2010 @ 10:02 am | Comment

“… your reference to the Final Solution is, I have to say, a bit dramatic, don’t you think?”

Actually, I don’t, Richard. They’re not about to build gas chambers, but I believe the Chinese government are fully capable of implementing a solution to regional unrest that is devoid of any human compassion. If Tibetans ceased to exist tomorrow I doubt anyone at Zhongnanhai would exhibit any vestige of genuine remorse.

August 5, 2010 @ 10:46 am | Comment

I just think we need to be careful about how we phrase things. I also think the Chinese have poured a lot of money into preserving Tibetan culture and, in their eyes, they are benefactors. Of course, this is a very obtuse perspective, but I do understand it.

August 5, 2010 @ 10:54 am | Comment

I believe the western nations have poured a lot of money in improving the Afghan nation too…but where’s the thanks?

;-)

August 5, 2010 @ 11:06 am | Comment

“I also think the Chinese have poured a lot of money into preserving Tibetan culture…”

Well, that’s the spin for the masses. They’re ‘preserving’ a culture on their own terms – one that demonstrates obeisance to Beijing in all matters. The extent of the destruction and looting of monasteries and shrines in Tibet in the last half century is a unique interpretation of ‘preservation’.

Is the region economically better off? Certainly. Improved infrastructure, schools, and hospitals? Yep. But who are the true beneficiaries, and to what ends has this investment been made? I don’t think the preservation of what Tibetans would consider to be their cultural beliefs and values has been a factor in Beijings investment. Far from it. It’s all about control.

August 5, 2010 @ 11:09 am | Comment

“Improved infrastructure, schools, and hospitals? Yep. But who are the true beneficiaries ..?”

Dalai Lama’s former serfs and their children, maybe? NOt that they matter as much as the lamas. H.H.D.L. (funny name it’s not) admits himself that Tibetans are better of staying within China.

August 5, 2010 @ 11:24 am | Comment

I don’t think there’s been a lot of looting and destruction of shrines and monasteries in the last 40 years. And I do think, as I said, that many Tibetans appreciate a lot of the progress. However, as with any occupation, resentments simmer, and the PRC hasn’t helped with its routinized repression. But I won’t be drawing any parallels to the Final Solution, and I honestly don’t believe China is indifferent to whether Tibetans survive or not. We may have to agree to disagree on that.

August 5, 2010 @ 11:25 am | Comment

Have comments been “broken” on the GT for a long time, or did I somehow get banned for trolling? If so, they were probably right to do so, I probably would’ve made some very obnoxious comments about this article.

August 5, 2010 @ 12:03 pm | Comment

Comments on GT, like everything about their Web interface, can be awfully dodgy. Don’t take it personally.

August 5, 2010 @ 12:06 pm | Comment

@ Hypo

Just been reading about you and your friends: http://bit.ly/blcynE

August 5, 2010 @ 12:08 pm | Comment

Stuart, thanks a lot for that link. Awesome.

August 5, 2010 @ 12:11 pm | Comment

Some Tibetans appreciate the changes, some do not. But don’t forget that some Tibetans joined the PLA, were Red Guards (particularly enthusiastic ones), and are part of the local government and police force in Tibet.

“The extent of the destruction and looting of monasteries and shrines in Tibet in the last half century is a unique interpretation of ‘preservation’.”

Most of which was done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.

August 5, 2010 @ 1:09 pm | Comment

“Most of which was done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.”

I respectfully refer you to the link I gave in my previous reply.

August 5, 2010 @ 1:25 pm | Comment

@Stuart

Richard is right. That link is awesome. And hysterical, too! I saw that link earlier today out on Twitter from LimLouisa of NPR. God bless CDT and UC Berkeley!

@merp

Did you recognize any of your fellow classmates in the wumao dang photos?

Really, Merp,

“The extent of the destruction and looting of monasteries and shrines in Tibet in the last half century is a unique interpretation of ‘preservation’.”

Most of which was done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.

Sounds like boilerplate to me! Merp, do you have a “Mad Libs” word editor program that throws in these phrases?

@Richard

I saw your Rein post out at Twitter and somehow ended up here. I saw your “motion sickness” comment above. I understand that too much sweetener, all at once, can induce all sorts of reactions. Actually, my reaction was to think that I had come upon a Capitol Steps skit. Wow, maybe I should suggest this one to them. They can make this another Hugh Jim Bissell episode. This one is right up his alley!

All I have to say is a Finn, a Suomilinen, has sold out, big time. My late father-in-law, Onnie, was a Finn. He would have had a fit reading that tripe.

Well, maybe selling out isn’t new to her. After all, she has been a consultant to Royal Dutch Shell and Newmont Mining. Ugghhhh! Shudddder!!

And I wonder who told her all these marvelous things she discovered?

August 5, 2010 @ 3:38 pm | Comment

My kudos to rudenoon.com and his blog. And as always, kudos to you Richard.

August 5, 2010 @ 3:54 pm | Comment

@ Jerry

“Richard is right. That link is awesome. And hysterical, too! I saw that link earlier today out on Twitter from LimLouisa of NPR. God bless CDT and UC Berkeley!”

Yeah, that’s where I picked it up. Agree, CDT is awesome.

August 5, 2010 @ 3:55 pm | Comment

Sirkka Korpela… naivety is not a trait one looks for in an ambassador… where do the UN find such people… and what hope is there that the UN will serve a useful function whilst they do!

August 5, 2010 @ 6:30 pm | Comment

@stuart,

He who doesn’t agree with my propaganda must be paid by the commies.

That’s right, the commies improved the life expectancies from 33 to 67 years. Deal with the fact.

August 5, 2010 @ 8:17 pm | Comment

In recent times I have seen diplomats from small countries being used as the front for voicing China’s propaganda. I do not fault these people after all, a diplomat, whether retired or not, basically “lies” abroad for the benefit of his or her country.

According to the Chinese Foreign Ministry’s website, “Since the establishment of diplomatic relations, the Chinese Government has provided the Bolivian Government with a number of economic and technical assistance, helping construction of 7 complete sets of projects including well-drilling, cultural center and small hydropower station, carrying out 3 technical cooperation projects including rice and vegetable cultivation.”

The ordinary Bolivians have a different view of Tibet. Many of them acted in he movie Seven Years in Tibet in Argentina, I think.

August 6, 2010 @ 1:42 am | Comment

@Tenzin Boepa said “the Chinese Government has provided the Bolivian Government with a number of economic and technical assistance….”

You are accusing China of buying friends. It’s all fine and good, a lot of countries do that. It’s called lobbying.

Just a minor point, the author is NOT a Bolivian government employee or Bolivian as a matter of fact. She’s from Finland (the country next to Russia in Europe) and currently lives in New York. And last time I check, Finnish hate commies.

August 6, 2010 @ 1:53 am | Comment

@ hypo

“And the last time I check, Finnish hate commies.”

Many Finns hate “real” commies, not necessarily Chinese commies. Think Nokia. In the words of Frank Zappa, “Is that a real poncho or is that a Sears poncho?” You guys are very Roebuck.

August 6, 2010 @ 6:57 am | Comment

“Sounds like boilerplate to me! Merp, do you have a “Mad Libs” word editor program that throws in these phrases?”

Believe what you want. The truth is no Han Chinese had enough emotionally invested to destroy any monasteries. The destruction to not only the Buddhist temples but to Mosques was in large carried out by Tibetan Red Guards. There were no Han “students” stationed in Tibet to carry it out.

August 6, 2010 @ 8:17 am | Comment

@jg

I might have overstated. My point is the author’s positive report of Tibet has nothing to do with China buying friends in Bolivia. Because let’s be honest here, the author is from Finland and base in New York.

August 6, 2010 @ 8:17 am | Comment

For some insight into the Tibetan Red Guards, here is one interesting blog post:

http://faroutliers.blogspot.com/2006/07/tibetan-red-guards-vs-tibetan-muslims.html

When the Red Guards—all of them Tibetan—came to purge Lhasa’s main Muslim quarter, Thelpung Khang, in 1969, there was a moment of bafflement. The Habaling Khache, being Muslims, had no idols or statues that could be smashed, no painted frescoes that could be defaced, no sacred pictures that could be ripped. There was nothing to destroy. So, after retreating to discuss this problem, the Red Guards sought out the ledgers, the old legal papers, the name-books, the dustar or ceremonial prayer caps, the maps, an ancient decree granting Muslims an exclusive graveyard on the edge of the city (Buddhists do not bury their dead), and every copy of the Holy Quran, including the imam’s own, which was several centuries old, and made them into a great bonfire in the courtyard in front of the mosque. The history of the Habaling Khache went up in flames.

August 6, 2010 @ 8:22 am | Comment

“Believe what you want. The truth is no Han Chinese had enough emotionally invested to destroy any monasteries.”

That’s a river in Africa, I believe.

August 6, 2010 @ 10:03 am | Comment

A river in Africa, I believe, would be your refusal to acknowledge that the Red Guards in Tibet were overwhelmingly Tibetan.

August 6, 2010 @ 1:40 pm | Comment

@Merp, let’s walk back through some of your statements.

“The extent of the destruction and looting of monasteries and shrines in Tibet in the last half century is a unique interpretation of ‘preservation’.”

Most of which was done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.

I have still seen no substantiation for your “former Tibetan serfs” remark.

You quoted from a blog which was quoting from Patrick French’s book, “Tibet, Tibet: A Personal History of a Lost Land”. French wrote, “When the Red Guards—all of them Tibetan—came to purge Lhasa’s main Muslim quarter, Thelpung Khang, in 1969, there was a moment of bafflement.” I have some comments.

There were probably Tibetan youth who joined the Red Guards starting in 1966; how many I don’t know. And, like most Red Guards, they would have been zealots. Mao seriously suggested that true revolutionaries like the Red Guards should not hesitate to kill those opposed to the ChiComs; he even specifically invoked Hitler’s memory in doing so. Mao had no problem with bloodlust; he correlated revolutionary with killing. His police chief encouraged the Red Guards to use violence. So these kids were whipped up.

I think it would be rather easy to encourage an unbalanced Red Guard youth, whether Chinese or Tibetan, to destroy all vestiges of Chinese and Tibetan culture. It would probably take very little for a Buddhist Tibetan Red Guard to attack Muslim mosques and Muslin Imams.

But, it seems that the Mao and his PLA suppressed and disbanded the Red Guard (often violently and lethally) by the summer of 1968. So, how did the Red Guard, Tibetan or not, come to Lhasa in 1969 for the purpose of attacking Muslims?

Going back to an earlier period, most of the Eastern Tibetans rose up against ChiCom rule in 1959, the start of the GLF, according to the same Patrick French (which you quoted, Merp) in an article he wrote in the Guardian UK in March of 2009 titled The view from the roof of the world.

According to French,

When the communists won the civil war in China in 1949 and set about capturing territory over which they believed Beijing had a historical claim, the teenage Dalai Lama was obliged to take up temporal power. Initially, he and his advisers thought Chairman Mao Zedong’s revolutionary reforms would bring progress and prosperity, and for nearly 10 years the Tibetan government co-existed with the invaders – a decade that has now been largely eradicated from popular history. But by 1959 and the start of the Great Leap Forward, as monasteries were destroyed and social structures undermined, the population of eastern Tibet rose up against communist rule, and the Dalai Lama escaped.

This does not seem to be consistent with the destruction of Tibetan monasteries being “done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.”

Merp, you also made the comment,

The truth is no Han Chinese had enough emotionally invested to destroy any monasteries. The destruction to not only the Buddhist temples but to Mosques was in large carried out by Tibetan Red Guards. There were no Han “students” stationed in Tibet to carry it out.

Merp, the Red Guard was not around until 1966. Destruction of the monasteries started in 1959, when the Eastern Tibetans rose up against the ChiCommies. Are you insisting that the Tibetans were rebelling against the ChiCommies and, at the same time, destroying their own monasteries? And the Red Guard had been forcibly suppressed and disbanded in 1968. How did Tibetan Red Guards destroy mosques in 1969 when they ceased to exist as an organization in 1968?

I suspect that Han PLA members were destroying the monasteries under order from their generals.

Merp, how do you know that there were no Han Red Guards stationed in Tibet? Seriously, Merp, would you mind substantiating these claims? Or, is this just shoot-from-the-hip rhetoric and opinions which you have been bestowing on us.

Merp, if you are going to make claims, you might want to substantiate them. And you might want to explain the inconsistencies.

August 12, 2010 @ 8:35 pm | Comment

Nice work, Jerry. I look forward to Merp’s response.

August 12, 2010 @ 10:46 pm | Comment

I have still seen no substantiation for your “former Tibetan serfs” remark.

Simply because the vast majority of Tibetans, especially around the TAR, were serfs- and the CCP drew upon these people for support.

But, it seems that the Mao and his PLA suppressed and disbanded the Red Guard (often violently and lethally) by the summer of 1968.

There isn’t a “Red Guard”. There were several factions, and activity in Tibet continued well beyond the “cut off date” you are proposing. It would be nice if things were so simple, but sadly they were not- even in Tibet alone there were several rival factions, which began to polarize on political lines.

This does not seem to be consistent with the destruction of Tibetan monasteries being “done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.”

It doesn’t contradict the claim either. Tibetans were actively recruited into Communism by the PRC.

Merp, the Red Guard was not around until 1966. Destruction of the monasteries started in 1959, when the Eastern Tibetans rose up against the ChiCommies. Are you insisting that the Tibetans were rebelling against the ChiCommies and, at the same time, destroying their own monasteries?

See above. There wasn’t a “the Red Guard”. Destruction may have started even earlier than 1959, but it reached its height in the 60s. And no, Eastern Tibetans did not “rise up against the ChiCommies”, a minority of Tibetans rebelled against ChiCommie land reforms- and kept in close contact with White Fascist Imperialists such as the CIA. White Fascist Terrorist Imperialists trained the men of Tibetan secular elites, and air dropped them into Tibet to spark riots. The end result is disastrous as you know- and the Tibetan rebels were soon betrayed and abandoned by the White Fascist Terrorists when Nixon visited ChiCommie Red China.

August 13, 2010 @ 4:50 am | Comment

…abandoned by the White Fascist Terrorists…

It must be tough living where you do, surrounded by such dangerous people n’ all.

Noble sacrifice to keep spouting BS for the Motherland, comrade. Stay close to the consulate, those CIA dudes are on to you!

August 13, 2010 @ 6:13 am | Comment

They aren’t dangerous so much as bumbling, self-deluding, hypocritical and just plain stupid.

August 13, 2010 @ 6:48 am | Comment

Merp, you’re pushing it again. I strongly advise caution.

August 13, 2010 @ 6:51 am | Comment

@Merp, my, oh my, oh my! As the great “White Fascist Terrorist Imperialist”, Red Barber, would say, “Oh, doctor!”

I wrote: I have still seen no substantiation for your “former Tibetan serfs” remark.

You replied: Simply because the vast majority of Tibetans, especially around the TAR, were serfs- and the CCP drew upon these people for support.

Substantiation, please. How does this have anything to do with “The extent of the destruction and looting of monasteries and shrines in Tibet in the last half century is a unique interpretation of ‘preservation’ … Most of which was done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.” (Your words, if you still remember!?) You have not substantiated your premise, which I suspect is just shoot-from-the-hip, wild-eyed speculation. SWAGs as we used to call them at Microsoft.

‘There isn’t a “Red Guard”.’ You earlier said,

The truth is no Han Chinese had enough emotionally invested to destroy any monasteries. The destruction to not only the Buddhist temples but to Mosques was in large carried out by Tibetan Red Guards. There were no Han “students” stationed in Tibet to carry it out.

So which is it? There were Tibetan Red Guards? Or there weren’t Tibetan Red Guards? It seems that you are suffering from amnesia, short-term memory loss or schizophrenia. Are you self-destructing here?

I wrote: This does not seem to be consistent with the destruction of Tibetan monasteries being “done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.”

It doesn’t contradict the claim either. Tibetans were actively recruited into Communism by the PRC.

Nice try at evasion. FAIL! Again, you are trying to evade substantiation. You made the claim, not I! Thus the burden of proof is on you!

See above. There wasn’t a “the Red Guard”. Destruction may have started even earlier than 1959, but it reached its height in the 60s. And no, Eastern Tibetans did not “rise up against the ChiCommies”, a minority of Tibetans rebelled against ChiCommie land reforms- and kept in close contact with White Fascist Imperialists such as the CIA. White Fascist Terrorist Imperialists trained the men of Tibetan secular elites, and air dropped them into Tibet to spark riots. The end result is disastrous as you know- and the Tibetan rebels were soon betrayed and abandoned by the White Fascist Terrorists when Nixon visited ChiCommie Red China.

Merp, you are self-destructing! You are engaging in speculation and rhetoric, IMHO. Not one ounce, not one gram of substantiation. And then you engage in some wild-eyed, paranoid name-calling. That certainly does not help your credibility.

Let me quote again from Patrick French’s Guardian UK article cited above. Patrick French is a respected author and Tibetologist.

When the communists won the civil war in China in 1949 and set about capturing territory over which they believed Beijing had a historical claim, the teenage Dalai Lama was obliged to take up temporal power. Initially, he and his advisers thought Chairman Mao Zedong’s revolutionary reforms would bring progress and prosperity, and for nearly 10 years the Tibetan government co-existed with the invaders – a decade that has now been largely eradicated from popular history. But by 1959 and the start of the Great Leap Forward, as monasteries were destroyed and social structures undermined, the population of eastern Tibet rose up against communist rule, and the Dalai Lama escaped.

Well, Merp, I am really not interested in engaging in speculation, rhetoric and wild-eyed name-calling. Next time, you might consider stating opinions as opinions and substantiating your claims. You might also pose arguments which are reasoned, lucid and cogent. Critical thinking and scientific reasoning are extremely useful!

August 13, 2010 @ 1:47 pm | Comment

Substantiation, please. How does this have anything to do with “The extent of the destruction and looting of monasteries and shrines in Tibet in the last half century is a unique interpretation of ‘preservation’ … Most of which was done by former Tibetan serfs who were mistreated.” (Your words, if you still remember!?) You have not substantiated your premise, which I suspect is just shoot-from-the-hip, wild-eyed speculation. SWAGs as we used to call them at Microsoft.

Obviously, as they drew upon the local population to fill the ranks they happened to recruit many former serfs. You haven’t substantiated any laughable Western claims of cultural genocide- so why is the onus upon me to prove a well-known fact? For the sake of your own self-imposed ignorance?

So which is it? There were Tibetan Red Guards? Or there weren’t Tibetan Red Guards? It seems that you are suffering from amnesia, short-term memory loss or schizophrenia. Are you self-destructing here?

Reading comprehension. Perhaps I should have included “a” under the parentheses, but I wasn’t aware you needed someone to hold your hand through your own failed argument.

In simpler speak- there wasn’t ONE Red Guard. You imply that it was a unified, monolithic movement that spread across China- even regional groups of Red Guards had their subdivisions- in the case of Tibet, Gyenlok and Nyamdrel

Nice try at evasion. FAIL! Again, you are trying to evade substantiation. You made the claim, not I! Thus the burden of proof is on you!

Nice try. Here I’ll make a deal- you substantiate the West’s laughable claims of cultural genocide, forced abortions, systematic human rights abuse, mercantilism, “settler” doctrine for Tibet. You’re the one shilling, not I. Thus the burden of proof is on you.

Do that for me and I’ll go dig up the sources for you. I’m not doing your homework for free. Sorry but your strategy of trying to tie me up with unsubstantiated claims while anti-China toadies desperately attempt to pick at typoes isn’t going to work here.

Merp, you are self-destructing! You are engaging in speculation and rhetoric, IMHO. Not one ounce, not one gram of substantiation. And then you engage in some wild-eyed, paranoid name-calling. That certainly does not help your credibility.

You’re the one who started calling people “ChiCommies” as if your gradeschool brainwashing/rhetoric makes up for horrible arguments. So I thought I’d humor you, it seems like you aren’t taking it well- then again hypocrisy and blubbering thin-skinned moaning are hallmarks of Western Civilization.

you might consider stating opinions as opinions and substantiating your claims.

Take your own advice. Like I said, substantiate the claims which fuel your faux moral outrage on Tibet and I will gladly reveal my sources.

Either that or pay me. Just $20-30 equivalent will suffice. That said your source does not conflict with my claims (it states destruction during the decade up until 1959, without specifics)- maybe your inability to synthesize information fully is what causes this cognitive dissonance?

August 14, 2010 @ 2:04 am | Comment

@Merp, here we go again.

You haven’t substantiated any laughable Western claims of cultural genocide- so why is the onus upon me to prove a well-known fact? For the sake of your own self-imposed ignorance?

Claims? What claims or assertions have I made? You made claims as if they were fact. If you don’t want to substantiate your claim, so be it. At best, what you spew is opinions and such is your right! “Self-imposed ignorance?” Seems like you are looking into your own mirror! And you really need some help with your insult game, chap. Eh? Well, you know, if you can’t dazzle them with brilliance, …

You still have not substantiated the “well-known fact” of former Tibetan serfs destroying Buddhist temples! :P

Reading comprehension. Perhaps I should have included “a” under the parentheses, but I wasn’t aware you needed someone to hold your hand through your own failed argument.

In simpler speak- there wasn’t ONE Red Guard. You imply that it was a unified, monolithic movement that spread across China- even regional groups of Red Guards had their subdivisions- in the case of Tibet, Gyenlok and Nyamdrel

At long last, some clarification from you! I guess I should treasure it since it so rarely emanates from your voluminous buffoonery? Oh well. Granted there were factions. Most organizations have them. But no connection still with Tibetans destroying their own temples, as per usual.

Implied? Really, Merp, you have to stop calling Miss Cleo and the Psychic Hotline!

I’m not doing your homework for free. Sorry but your strategy of trying to tie me up with unsubstantiated claims while anti-China toadies desperately attempt to pick at typoes isn’t going to work here.

I would not want you doing my homework. I am intellectually and academically rigorous. I just would not want to “poison my well” with your work. Chap, you could make a killing by running as a GOP candidate, using the “anti-China toady typos attack”! How long did that one take you? Really, you ought to get together with Rep. Louis Gomert of “terror babies” infamy!

You’re the one who started calling people “ChiCommies” as if your gradeschool brainwashing/rhetoric makes up for horrible arguments.

Sorry, Merp. Next time, I will use the term ChiDems! Don’t you think that is more representative of Chinese governance? Eh?

So I thought I’d humor you, it seems like you aren’t taking it well- then again hypocrisy and blubbering thin-skinned moaning are hallmarks of Western Civilization.

Merp, you really nailed that one on the head. Yesssirrrreeee, Bob! Are you running out of steam here, chap? Eh?

Either that or pay me. Just $20-30 equivalent will suffice.

Sorry, Merp. You seem to me an wumao. In fact, 1/2 of a RMB sounds like too much to me, what with I have seen so far from you! :D

maybe your inability to synthesize information fully is what causes this cognitive dissonance?

Sorry, Merp, you have your brain science all screwed-up here. Cognitive dissonance triggers biased assimilation. If you are going to borrow science from others, make sure you get your “facts” straight!

Perhaps, Merp, you are just confused, or just plain angry. Your hubris is notable and rather unwarranted. I suspect that you want to win arguments so badly that you are willing to make the strangest, most bizarre claims, comments, diversions, evasions and extrapolations. But don’t fret, chap! You have a future with the Tea Party, birthers and right-wingers in the GOP! You lucky dog, you!

And, as one final reminder. You still have not substantiated the “well-known fact” of former Tibetan serfs destroying Buddhist temples! :P Perhaps your “well-known fact” is pure, imaginary speculation? Eh? Which is ok, if you yourself label it as such! :P LMAO!

August 14, 2010 @ 10:17 pm | Comment

Claims? What claims or assertions have I made?

For one, you claimed there was one single Red Guard and that was instantly called off in 1968. You’re flat out wrong.

August 18, 2010 @ 5:55 am | Comment

@Merp,

When I assert or claim something, you will know; then again, maybe you won’t. Who knows? I wrote,

But, it seems that the Mao and his PLA suppressed and disbanded the Red Guard (often violently and lethally) by the summer of 1968. So, how did the Red Guard, Tibetan or not, come to Lhasa in 1969 for the purpose of attacking Muslims?

To me, that is not a claim or assertion. It seems that you don’t have the necessary critical thinking and scientific reasoning to make that determination. Hardly surprising! Which drives me to the conclusion that further discussion with you is a fruitless endeavor. Just like SK warned me earlier!

In the words of E. A. Poe’s Southern cousin, Beauregard Chauncey Poe, “Quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore, bubba!’” LMAO! And with that, Resident Wumao Merp, mon ami, it is time to say adieu! (Please note that I did not use au revoir, à demain, or à bientôt!) I suspect that the differences may be too subtle, too nuanced for you, but ça, c’est la vie!

@Jeremiah, thanks.

August 18, 2010 @ 1:14 pm | Comment

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