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Hacked By AdGhosT

Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

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China quick to label Egypt uprising as “chaotic” » The Peking Duck

China quick to label Egypt uprising as “chaotic”

We all know the line abut Tiananmen Square, that we can only thank God the CCP saved China from chaos by cracking down on the protesters by whatever means necessary. This argument was carried to another extreme in the case of Russia, where the rapid switch to democracy plunged the nation into chaos. Every schoolchild in China knows about that. And now Egypt. Seems like whenever a dictatorship is threatened, the CCP feels the need to desperately convince its citizens that change equals chaos.

Egypt may well be facing chaos. Russia indeed went through a long period of chaos. The protests in Tiananmen Square were nothing if not chaotic. But sometimes chaos is part of a phase toward stability. Often the relatively brief period of chaos ultimately leads to something better than the decades of oppression that preceded it. But that’s not how the CCP sees it, and they were lightening-swift in branding the Egyptian protests as an invitation to chaos.

Censoring the Internet is not the only approach. The Chinese government has also tried to get out ahead of the discussion, framing the Egyptian protests in a few editorials and articles in state-controlled news publications as a chaotic affair that embodies the pitfalls of trying to plant democracy in countries that are not quite ready for it — a line China’s leaders have long held.

The English-language edition of Global Times, a populist newspaper, ran an editorial on Sunday about the Tunisian and Egyptian protests with the headline “Color revolutions will not bring about real democracy.” Though Global Times is not the official mouthpiece of the Communist Party, the message of the editorial was consistent with official thinking, saying bluntly that whether democracy “is applicable in other countries is in question, as more and more unsuccessful examples arise.”

….Some of the news coverage of Egypt that has appeared in People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s main newspaper, and Xinhua, the official news agency, has focused on attempts by China to evacuate its citizens, simply leaving out the political discontent at the root of the unrest.

Of course, if I didn’t know better, I might think the party was nervous about its own people seeing what’s going on in Egypt as a good thing, and getting their own ideas about how it might be time to try the same approach in China. Now, as I said in my last post, this is a pretty groundless fear. There is no reason to believe the Chinese will take to the streets and risk life and limb to tear down a regime that most of them see as a vast improvement over what they had before, or that they at worst see as a necessary evil. But the CCP always gets the jitters when it sees people anywhere rising up to demand democratic reforms.

The “C word” is a very powerful tool for convincing people to shut their pie holes and get back to work and be happy for what they’ve got. For a society taught at birth to prize harmony over nearly everything else, nothing can be more terrifying than the threat of chaos. So it’s hardly a surprise to see the propgandists spinning their wheels to get the chaos meme out there, while censoring like mad to keep awareness of the Egyptian protests at a minimum. They have to worry that a lot of Chinese people are watching Egypt closely, despite the censorship and propaganda:

….Zhao Jing, a liberal Chinese blogger who goes by the name of Michael Anti, said that “it was amazing netizens on Twitter cared about Egypt so much” that they had begun drawing parallels between China and Egypt. President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt was being called Mu Xiaoping, a reference to Deng Xiaoping, who quashed the 1989 popular protests in Beijing, while Tahrir Square in Cairo was being compared to Tiananmen Square.

But that interest isn’t translating into rebellion. The government should be a little more secure. They’ve made it nearly impossible for a challenger to arise and take their place, and despite the buzz on China’s social networks, the Chinese are in no mood for another Tiananmen Square. Conditions would have to be a lot worse, with more people convinced they had nothing to lose. Maybe someday not too far off, but not today.

______________

Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 217 Comments

To FOARP, JR, KT,
I believe in being a Good Samaritan. Pointing out stupidity in the face of ignorance thereof is me doing my little bit for western society…which is probably where that hypocrite lives, incidentally. Of course, he would never admit to that.

February 14, 2011 @ 6:30 am | Comment

@SK Cheung
Aren’t these “smart” people the ones you would vouch for in your meritocracy dream-world?

Yawn. A “good democracy” is inferior to a mediocre meritocracy.

and the net effect for the economy of all that apparently great work, prior to 1979 and the adoption of the free-market system, was…?

China’s economy under Mao’s rule was just about average for the world.

And maybe you should’ve qualified the suggestion that China was at odds with 2 superpowers for 30 whole years.

Learn how to read. I clearly stated that it was throughout his rule. You love pointing out how I imply things you didn’t say- rather it’s you who doesn’t understand the meaning of the words you cram together not unlike many others with Asperger’s.

you know what

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger%27s_Syndrome

Although individuals with Asperger syndrome acquire language skills without significant general delay and their speech typically lacks significant abnormalities, language acquisition and use is often atypical.[5] Abnormalities include verbosity, abrupt transitions, literal interpretations and miscomprehension of nuance, use of metaphor meaningful only to the speaker,, auditory perception deficits, unusually pedantic, formal or idiosyncratic speech

Not sure about the auditory perception deficits because this can’t be tested in writing.

and this measure is…? And the validity of this “measure” is determined by…? And the threshold is…?

When all other measurements are in doubt, basically when the people have enough free time to riot combined with the desire to do so is a good way to estimate when a government is going to “change” (the destabilizing, non-gradual type you’re so partial to).

And the total population of those eastern regions far exceeds that of Taiwan, and hence the scale issues that seem beyond your comprehension.

Oh yes, all we need is a few hundred thousand telepathic teachers and mind-reading students to cross the massive geographic much less linguistic divides along the East Coast of China! Genius! Canada must immediately hire you to head their schools. Oh wait, you don’t believe that merit and government should mix. Too bad.

and are buying that many more books, it costs less to produce/buy each book the more you buy.

HAHAHAHAHA Cheungsie actually thinks “books” are the major expense in education. You are a funny aspie.

more stuff that I’ve not said.

Sorry, we can’t all speak in esoteric metaphor and idiosyncratic speech; therefore when you flatly dismiss my common sense points about how external threats must be prioritized, it implies that you either don’t understand the kind of pressure China faces or are just a meth-addled hippie.

February 14, 2011 @ 6:49 am | Comment

@SKC. yourfriend. Canada, if my faulty memory serves.

This is a common feature of this FQ class. All the Harmonny crew live in the US, with the overlord living in Silicon Valley of all places. ChasL is New York. My immigration dept has a sensible policy. No visas for fifth columnists pure and simple.

Mongol warrior is an exception. He resides in his own mental straight jacket.

February 14, 2011 @ 6:58 am | Comment

No- I don’t live in Canada. And your memory is indeed faulty because I never posted anything about my life while you were around.

You don’t appear to be the type that can lurk quietly.

February 14, 2011 @ 7:18 am | Comment

Back on topic…sort of 😉
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/peterfoster/100074119/chinas-censorship-of-the-egypt-protests-isnt-fooling-everyone/

Loved this para
“Urban, educated Chinese routinely disparage the state broadcasters unutterably dull news output as really only fit for the simpler minds “you find in the villages”, as an undergraduate at one of Beijing’s elite universities memorably said to me recently.”

“Yawn. A “good democracy” is inferior to a mediocre meritocracy.”
Only for those in charge, my dear. Not a villager, are you?

February 14, 2011 @ 8:43 am | Comment

“Aren’t these “smart” people the ones you would vouch for in your meritocracy dream-world?…
Yawn. A “good democracy” is inferior to a mediocre meritocracy.”
—LOL. I guess THIS is “one of the last times (you) respond point by point”. The countdown has begun since the last time you said this. I’ll be sorry to see you reach that “last time”, whenever that may be. My good health will dearly miss your regular and reliable contributions and assistance.
Now, what you quoted of mine ends with a question mark (?). Usually, that means a question has been posed. Pray tell, how does your “response” actually respond to the question? (btw, that was another question in and of itself). Also, my earlier comment posed several questions. I think you failed to take note of them (yet again).
As for your response, a “democracy” may be inferior for those who wrongly fancy themselves to have merit, since their self-evaluation will need to pass muster with those pesky “outside regulators”. For those who prefer to “self-regulate”, I imagine your “mediocre meritocracy” would indeed be very popular. I mean, who needs accountability, right?

“China’s economy under Mao’s rule was just about average for the world.”
—but it isn’t what it is now, is it? This incredible growth we’ve seen in the last 30 years, didn’t really occur with the authoritarian/communist combo, did it? I wonder what’s changed since then…hmmm…evidently a bit of a thinker for some of the slower members of the crowd. Again, take your time.

“I clearly stated that it was throughout his rule.”
—what you “stated”, and reality, are often two very different things.

“and this measure is…? And the validity of this “measure” is determined by…? And the threshold is…?…
When all other measurements are in doubt, basically when the people have enough free time to riot combined with the desire to do so”
—huh? So this “comprehensive measure of national strength” you referred to in #194 is the ‘riot propensity index’? (my phrase, not yours) Well, thanks to you, I just got healthier yet again. So now, forget GDP. What the CCP is waiting for is the riot threshold. That is brilliant stuff. However, I wonder if the CCP will roll over in the face of such riot, or simply viciously put it down (in the name of “stability”, of course; never for CCP self-preservation)?

“you don’t believe that merit and government should mix.”
—you are so slow on the uptake, and so weak in debate logic, that the CCP should really reconsider their efforts. Merit and government do mix; the main difference is who gets to judge merit. I’ve said this many times before. Hey, earlier you said “good memory” is a merit. Apparently that’s another “merit” you don’t have.

“Cheungsie actually thinks “books” are the major expense in education”
—good grief. It is an example of an expense where scale matters. If I had a nickel for every time you argue against something I didn’t say, well, I’d have a lot of nickels.

“you flatly dismiss my common sense points about how external threats must be prioritized”
—I dismiss them for several reasons. First, you don’t have common sense, and your “points” aren’t adorned with them either. Second, your perceived threats are borne out of some fantasy-land paranoia, piled on top of a deep-seated victim mentality, admixed with the standard dose of “anti-western” rhetoric. And third, but more importantly, the response to your perceived threats doesn’t require or justify the continued maintenance of authoritarianism in China. I don’t believe Chinese people are naturally inclined to capitulate to anyone, even without the paternal guidance of your beloved CCP. So chew on that for a bit.

So, there is a huge running list of questions you’ve yet to respond to, even in this and my previous post. I see you didn’t want to respond to the challenge of letting Chinese people be the judge of your paranoias. But at least you’ve given the life expectancy stuff a rest. Too bad, really, cuz that was fun. Knowing when to cut your losses is a merit of sorts, I suppose, so way to be.

Well, good to know you don’t live in Canada. Your knowledge of Canada is abysmal, and I didn’t think our education system was that bad. Any time you feel the urge to disprove your hypocrisy, you go right ahead, y’hear?

February 14, 2011 @ 9:39 am | Comment

To KT:
yes, North America (and the US in particular) seems like a homing beacon to those angry young kids. The two head cheeses of the crew you speak of live in Northern California, in and around the city by the bay, if memory serves. One rabid dude lives in DC or somewhere in the Beltway. Another in Manhattan, I believe. At least they did back in the FM days.

February 14, 2011 @ 9:48 am | Comment

The benefits of meritocracy…CCP-style
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/14/world/asia/14maotai.html?ref=global-home
““I hear most of it gets delivered to Zhongnanhai,” said Wang Yonghui, 32, a bank teller and baijiu aficionado, referring to the Beijing compound that houses the country’s top leaders. “We pay more, and they get it for free.” ”

😉

February 14, 2011 @ 10:18 am | Comment

Re #203: once in a while, JB felt good, KT. Or so he sang.

February 14, 2011 @ 2:24 pm | Comment

@ Mike. Great link, so here is my PRC-SK booze report card.

Moutaiu (sic)is simply too strong to be an enjoyable experience.

In contrast, soju has only a 22% alcohol content (reduced from 32% in 2000), has a clean taste and goes down a treat with fresh orange juice. Farm/homemade soju comes in a variety of fruit flavours and is great for that special occasion with that heavy drinking Korean gf.

Korean beer (one being (s)Hite) is truly disgusting, overpriced stuff, and only good for washing your trainers.

China turns out lots of good low alcohol beers using Germany brewing methods, and they cost about the same as a large bottled water. Here I vote for Qui Han and the local Harbin drop. Tsingtao’s quality varies according to the water supply.

Forget that swill produced in the US and Canada. In, fact both these countries should be reversing the shanzhai process and be turning out copies of good Chinese beers. I’m serious.

February 14, 2011 @ 4:23 pm | Comment

“China turns out lots of good low alcohol beers using Germany brewing methods”

Good that the Germans stayed in Quingdao for some time.

February 14, 2011 @ 5:15 pm | Comment

@SKC, KT – The bizarrest was BXBQ, who was a professor working in the US and blurbled on about the necessity of constructing barriers between China and the “west”. The fact that such barriers would leave him on the wrong side never seemed to occur to him.

And no, I don’t know what it is about the US. I guess there is a certain paranoia which is particularly American (thinking of Fox News, birthers, truthers, JFK assasination nuts, UFO cultists etc. etc. etc.).

February 15, 2011 @ 2:37 am | Comment

To FOARP and KT:
ahh, forgot about BXBQ. That guy was pretty special. He wrote a lot of posts for a while, but didn’t take very well to pointed questioning. In that way, he is not unlike a lot of his type.

As for ChasL, I remember that handle only from China Divide (whatever happened to Kai Pan). As I recall, that handle is the same as Charles Liu, who also happens to be Bobby Fletcher. That guy gets around, although I thought he was from the Pacific Northwest.

I’m personally partial to Guinness myself, especially freezing cold, frosted Guinness glass, slow pour. Ahh, heaven. I’m not much for mass produced Canadian/US beer either. Budweiser is cat urine in a bottle. However, there are lots of microbrews who put out good stuff. The darker the better. I’m also partial to some Belgian beers.

February 15, 2011 @ 4:46 am | Comment

BXBQ was the looniest FQ of them all, hands down.

February 15, 2011 @ 5:02 am | Comment

FOARP
@SKC, KT – The bizarrest was BXBQ, who was a professor working in the US and blurbled on about the necessity of constructing barriers between China and the “west”. The fact that such barriers would leave him on the wrong side never seemed to occur to him.

Are you also one of those people who are so shocked to find that Western educated Muslims can also be the most “radical”?

How con-fuddling!

SK Cheung
LOL. I guess THIS is “one of the last times (you) respond point by point”.

Cheungsie, I did stop responding point by point. Now I just discard 90% of them and just pick out your biggest error because honestly with such a huge posting delay on my side I think you’re having trouble keeping up with even the things you are saying yourself.

This incredible growth we’ve seen in the last 30 years, didn’t really occur with the authoritarian/communist combo, did it?

Are you implying that the growth would have been possible if the hardline CCP didn’t secure borders and double life expectancy among other things?

the main difference is who gets to judge merit.

Yes, the mob. We get it now. Oh wait, now for you to backpedal and say “not the mob in isolation” despite you specifically just now saying “the mob in isolation and only in isolation”.

good grief. It is an example of an expense where scale matters.

Oh okay we’ll take books on one side of the scale and weight it against massive overcrowding and a strain on all resources, hmm does the benefit outweigh the cost? It depends, do you have Asperger’s?

Second, your perceived threats are borne out of some fantasy-land paranoia, piled on top of a deep-seated victim mentality, admixed with the standard dose of “anti-western” rhetoric.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA oh yes the Cold War never happened, China has never been invaded or attacked before, the West is 100% trustworthy. Fair and balanced! You, on the other hand, are a naive boy of a man who is practically drooling all over himself as he reads the West’s corporate transcripts off a cue card to unsuspecting Chinese victims. Boring. But you might learn how the world works some day, and progress to a point where you can actually carry a conversation about anything besides the propaganda you were raised with. I was hoping you’d appreciate the stats on patents, cited papers, wealth (not income) inequality, etc but that’s far beyond your ability.

Mike
“Urban, educated Chinese routinely disparage the state broadcasters unutterably dull news output as really only fit for the simpler minds “you find in the villages”, as an undergraduate at one of Beijing’s elite universities memorably said to me recently.”

Seems pretty par for the course- though when Chinese TV isn’t being a ridiculous “craptacular” it’s actually kind of interesting when they cover history, culture and travel.

February 16, 2011 @ 3:43 am | Comment

Listen, if you want to respond to certain points, and simply concede the others, that’s fine by me. Whatever floats your boat. Whether you’re unwilling to answer, or unable to answer, makes no difference to me. It does spare me from reminding you about the things you haven’t addressed, since that list will be growing exponentially now.

“Are you implying that the growth would have been possible”
—did she not spend the first 30 years securing borders and increasing life expectancy? Why did it take a change to a free market system before the economy took off? Besides, that’s all in the past anyway. Her economy will be the driver of further life expectancy increases now. And who is going to breach her borders? Oh right, the yankees. WHich means, as I’ve said all along, that she doesn’t need authoritarianism any longer.

“Yes, the mob”
—yes, Chinese people should get to judge merit. It’s unfortunate that you would characterize them that way, but you do what you gotta do.
You are so intellectually limited that you don’t even know when to use which phrases. Elections are majority rule in isolation. But democracy is more than just elections, and more than just majority rule in isolation. You should really learn more about it. There’s only so much I can help you with.

“It is an example of an expense where scale matters….

Oh okay we’ll take books on one side of the scale and weight it against massive overcrowding…”
—you really are showing yourself to be a special kind of stupid. In the discussion so far, “scale” refers to economies of scale. Not something with which to measure mass. Yet again, taking disingenuous to a new low. That, you’re good at.

“does the benefit outweigh the cost?”
—stupid person asking a stupid question. But you should answer it. Does the “cost-benefit analysis” favour educating Chinese children? Gosh, I really would’ve thought the CCP could do better than you. But like I’ve said, you make me laugh, so you’re good for something.

“oh yes the Cold War never happened, China has never been invaded or attacked before,”
—no no, the Cold War certainly happened. But one does need to take note of the past tense there. Perhaps Webster’s can help you out with that. China has been attacked before…but surprisingly, not by America. Well, I guess the Americans COULD possibly maybe perhaps attack tomorrow. And the sky could possibly maybe fall down tomorrow too. You do indeed have very many things to worry about. It might require medication.

“he reads the West’s corporate transcripts off a cue card to unsuspecting Chinese victims”
—even if I did do that, which I’m obviously not, i would still happily let Chinese people make up their own minds. Which is infinitely more than what you’ll ever be able to dream of saying.

“I was hoping you’d appreciate the stats on patents, cited papers, wealth (not income) inequality”
—none of which justifies continued authoritarianism in China. Oh right, you didn’t want to address that point.

February 16, 2011 @ 3:00 pm | Comment

@yourfriend: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eMkth8FWno

February 17, 2011 @ 2:47 am | Comment

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