New photocopy rules for Tibetans

I know, their lives are better, their roads are better, their schools are better, they get more funding than any other minority and they’re grateful the shackles of serfdom have been lifted. Still, no one can tell me there is not at least a hint of a police-state to life under Tibet’s benefactors.

People in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa will have to register their names if they want to make photocopies. City shopkeepers say the authorities are particularly concerned about material printed in Tibetan.

This appears to be an attempt to prevent ordinary people from printing political pamphlets and other documents. It suggests the security forces still have a tight grip on the city, two years after serious riots.

Individuals wanting to photocopy documents will have to show their ID cards and have the information recorded. Companies will have to register their names and addresses, the number of copies they want and provide the name of the manager in charge of the work. The police say they will carry out checks and punish any shop that does not abide by the new regulation.

Photocopying outlets in Lhasa told the BBC that the rule is primarily aimed at the Tibetan language. One shopkeeper said she would not now make copies of documents in Tibetan without police approval first. Material printed in Chinese does not seem to be too much of a problem.

The authorities say the change is aimed at stopping criminals carrying out illegal activities. But the suspicion is that it is directed at those who might want to print political pamphlets critical of the Chinese government.

Gee, who would have guessed about that last part?

[Deleted the rest of this post sorry; for writing such self-righteous drivel. It happens sometime, especially when I rush a post before I need to go out.]

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Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 19 Comments

Maybe the Chinese government want to stop of what is equivalent to the Polish Underground Press.

May 20, 2010 @ 8:35 am | Comment

Just one more example of the world’s next great superpower quivering in its skin over the possibility that recipients of its sweet ministrations might want to write and copy information that could spark social unrest.

Isn’t it so cute how Western pundits love accusing China of “quivering” or some other variant, like cowering in fear, or shaking in their boots, etc.

They are simply doing what makes sense- the West has a giant bullseye trained on Tibet. How come the Inner Mongolians, Koreans, Manchus, Miao, Yi, Hui, Dai, Naxi and Bai don’t need any of these regulations?

Probably because there a certain hateful, bigoted, paranoid hegemon trying to get the Miao to secede, perhaps. Or maybe China is just wary of extremely peaceful people, especially ones that can levitate or survive on prayer for 10 years straight. Some jedi shit right there.

May 20, 2010 @ 8:46 am | Comment

In retrospect this was a pretty bad post, written too quickly and formulaically. Maybe I’ll zap it later (I’m writing this on a friend’s iPhone.)

May 20, 2010 @ 9:33 am | Comment

In every office in America, there are restrictions on using photocopiers and printers. As we enter the green age, paper cannot be wasted.

I thought Americans are the ones promoting a green lifestyle, a low-carbon lifestyle?

May 20, 2010 @ 9:46 am | Comment

Fear behind it is proof of insecurity?

Ask yourself how the fear of insecurity originate. It’s not rocket science when CCP is clamping down on an ethnic group that has a history of CIA/betrayals and NED-funding.

Until Tibetan political sect overseas stop with their political agenda, I believe CCP will loosen their grips.

You don’t see Hui in Tibet getting oppressed? Why? They have no history of CIA/betrayals.

May 20, 2010 @ 10:35 am | Comment

“Photocopying outlets in Lhasa told the BBC that the rule is primarily aimed at the Tibetan language. One shopkeeper said she would not now make copies of documents in Tibetan without police approval first. Material printed in Chinese does not seem to be too much of a problem.”

Information imperialism and linguistic apartheid. Period.

May 20, 2010 @ 11:28 am | Comment

Do we know what the punishment will be for illegal photocopying?

May 20, 2010 @ 4:42 pm | Comment

confirmed torpedo = kill(skorea).
as I’m taking my finals.
like it matters, in US of A anywho.
what a strange situation to be here.
nor there.
az says we don’t like those who immigrate.
US says…..so what.

May 20, 2010 @ 4:57 pm | Comment

I presume that if someone bought their own copier they could do what they liked with it. As for the person photocopying in a store, I wouldn’t think even the Chinese State would punish someone for photocopying and not showing his ID because he wasn’t asked to – would it?

The stores will be the ones penalised the most. At the least a hefty fine and quite possibly being shut down after multiple “violations”.

May 20, 2010 @ 8:08 pm | Comment

I will present an idea to the Chinese authority to once and for all solve this Tibet problem: Legalize the gaming industry in Lhasa.

May 21, 2010 @ 12:15 am | Comment

No no no, StP, you must learn the lesson properly!

Kill 98% of their population with “disease” and THEN set up the casinos- it will prove how generous you are!

May 21, 2010 @ 4:07 am | Comment

Restrict photocopying, then distribute Freegate. It’s the CCP’s attempt at environmental responsibility…

May 21, 2010 @ 8:16 am | Comment

And we are surprised some of the Tibetan people do not want to be part of China?

May 25, 2010 @ 7:24 am | Comment

Yes indeed, because it’s some- most Westerners believe every single Tibetan man, woman, child, baby, fetus, yak, dog and cat want independence. Because they have like a totally psychic karmadelic connection with all of them, maaannn

May 25, 2010 @ 9:10 am | Comment

Merp, seriously, learn to read. Yu’er said “SOME…Tibetan people”. How does that become “every single Tibetan…”? Sweet jeepers! And while a “westerner’s” connection with Tibetan people may indeed be tenuous, it is also useful to realize it is, at worst, no worse than your own.

May 25, 2010 @ 9:56 am | Comment

Learn how to read. He said this:

And we are surprised some of the Tibetan people do not want to be part of China?

I said YES, “we” are surprised, because it’s SOME, not ALL. Like “we” believed.

Canada’s tax dollars at work here.

May 26, 2010 @ 12:31 am | Comment

it is also useful to realize it is, at worst, no worse than your own.

lol.

May 26, 2010 @ 12:31 am | Comment

Umm, Einstein, Yu’er said “some” in reference to Tibetans; you said “some” in reference to “westerners”. I realize it’s the same word, but it’s referring to different things. Do you need me to draw it out some more for you? You need to work harder in middle school if you are to have any hope of ever learning anything, bud.

May 26, 2010 @ 4:37 am | Comment

in reference to Tibetans; you said “some” in reference to “westerners”.

No, smartboy, I said “some” in reference to Tibetans. Again, pass 3rd grade English and perhaps you will understand.

May 26, 2010 @ 7:07 am | Comment

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