Truth in Iran

This is a guest post from long-time Peking Duck reader and contributor Bill Stimson. It’s not about China, but maybe there are some parallels?

Truth in Iran
by William R. Stimson

A fake president rants to a fake crowd about his administration’s mobilization to confront a fake enemy. Fake journalists are present to ensure that the fake story gets out. The real journalists are all in jail. The real media are all closed down. The real president gets attacked by thugs for trying to come out and speak to the real crowds that are trying to gather. The fake crowds have been assembled, paid, bussed in, and provided with flags to wave; but the real ones have been intimidated with arrests and even hangings and have had their means of communication cut. What few still do manage somehow to form are quickly chased down and attacked by the administration’s only real mobilization, the one against its only real enemy – its own people.

These descend from one of the world’s oldest and most magnificent linguistic, literary, and cultural traditions. In 13th Century Persian, its great poet Jalalud’din Rumi expressed the deepest and most utterly authentic pole of Islam. In lines still sung by schoolgirls all over Iran, he celebrated the intoxicating delight of the heart that breaks free from stale religious dogma and its niggling rules to flow with divine love emanating from the eternal now – a winged heart that heals everything it touches, and half the time doesn’t bother to categorize itself as religious, political, or personal. Many who sang and danced in the streets of Teheran prior to last summer’s election felt and expressed this heart that flies with truth and can see through the present order to a better world.

This joyous outpouring of people celebrating in the streets deeply alarmed Iran’s uptight supreme leader and his cohorts, who represent the diametrical opposite, most superficial and deadeningly fake, pole of Islam. For these sterile ideologues and harsh disciplinarians, religion is not an indwelling enlightenment dancing naturally out of the awakened heart, but entails forcing upon the mind and behavior of the populace an acquired belief system, outside authority, shallow legalistic codes, and (their own) political tyranny.

By rigging the election, the supreme leader thought to crush what he saw as a velvet revolution. But it wasn’t a velvet revolution. The velvet revolutions of Eastern Europe aimed to and did overthrow Communist regimes to install democratic ones. Iran’s opposition never set out to change Iran’s system of government – only make it function as it should according to its own constitution.

The green opposition movement could never have undone the supreme leader to the extent it has were it not for the fraudulent behavior he condoned and perpetuated, the mendacity, and the unbelievably cruel and brutal tactics unleashed against innocent civilians. Whatever in the end becomes of him and his cronies can only be what he and they deserve. That this victory is being won by a whole people, unarmed, standing together on the side of truth, will be seen as the defining moment of our times.

The unique power of Iran’s green opposition, and the reason it cannot be defeated, is that it is composed of so many disparate sectors of society, all sharing a certain core belief in a new and more wholesome direction and all acting from a deeply shared part of themselves. The government can take away the people’s Twitter, their Facebook, their Gmail, and even their cell phones. It can prevent them from gathering, it can imprison them, it can torture them, it can sodomize and rape them. It can even hang them. But it can’t seem to cut them off from their only real resource and means of communication – the heart that flies with truth.

* * *

______________

Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 57 Comments

Mike Golddork,

Show me where I have blamed China for any Iranian problem?

Why did you post this article?

http://persian2english.wordpress.com/2010/01/01/a-note-about-the-armoured-vehicles-from-china-to-iran/

The WTC “conspiracies” are all over the ethernet and debunked numerous times.

Sure sure sure, and those same people still believe that Saddam has something to do with 9/11.

You are an idiot. Here’s one way of telling
“In that case, why does this theocratic state have an election in the first place?” If you’re not an idiot, you’re incredibly naive.

That’s not a dumb question. Instead of name calling, why don’t answer the question?

Here’s another
“Yeah, western progaganda wants to believe there’s some kind of green revolution and the elections is ‘rigged.’.”
The people doing the compaining were….Iranian. Iranian politicians, Iranian clerics, Iranian people. You’ll find the west was rather quiet on that issue, politically. And given my opening line on this comment, that’s three examples of idiocy. Sorry, fool – that means you’re out. Now go and play with the kids and leave us grown ups alone…

Iranians complains, so what? There are Iranians who also support the current president and clerics. And according to the elections, most of them voted for the current president. Oh yeah, according to you, they don’t count because they are not part of the ‘green’ revolution.

That’s okay, keep calling me names, maybe you described yourself best as who’s the kid around here.

March 10, 2010 @ 9:59 pm | Comment

Is anyone surprised that Pug is a 911 Truther? Now we know.

Pug, no one rational believes Saddam had anything to do with 911. That meme was blasted to bits by the US media, and you cannot cite a single major media that claims Saddam had something to do with the attack, as disappointed as that made Dick Cheney. The only ones clinging to such nonsense are loons and losers, akin to those who say 911 was an inside job.

March 11, 2010 @ 12:33 am | Comment

Tea_party
“Why did you post this article?”
It showed Chinese involvement (in some small way) in the Iranian protests etc and I felt it might have been of interest in this discussion.

“That’s not a dumb question”
It makes my head hurt in it’s sheer idiocy. Why does Burma have elections (elections that end up in your house arrest if you happen to win instead of SLORC)? Why did Saddam Hussein have elections (where he used to get 99% of the vote). Why does PRC have non Communist political parties (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_parties_in_the_People's_Republic_of_China) when only the CCP can have power (and what heppens if you join a banned party? http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/feb/10/chinese-worker-jailed-political-party)? It’s to confer a degree of legitimacy to the regime…sheesh! Helloooo, anything upstairs?

I shall continue to taunt you until you grow a pube or two and come back with some decent arguments.

March 11, 2010 @ 4:11 am | Comment

For Pug
http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/20100301_thinking_about_unthinkable_usiranian_deal

Now, none of this is the “truth” – it is geopolitical opinions…though made by people who study this sort of thing. Linked above but here it is online in full (you don’t have to give your email address for to receive the article).

March 11, 2010 @ 4:28 am | Comment

Mike Goldthumb,

It showed Chinese involvement (in some small way) in the Iranian protests etc and I felt it might have been of interest in this discussion.

Exactly, from that article, you seem to blame China on problems in Iran.

It makes my head hurt in it’s sheer idiocy. Why does Burma have elections (elections that end up in your house arrest if you happen to win instead of SLORC)? Why did Saddam Hussein have elections (where he used to get 99% of the vote). Why does PRC have non Communist political parties (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_parties_in_the_People’s_Republic_of_China) when only the CCP can have power (and what heppens if you join a banned party? http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/feb/10/chinese-worker-jailed-political-party)? It’s to confer a degree of legitimacy to the regime…sheesh! Helloooo, anything upstairs?

Maybe your head hurt because you seem to be flopping at your own questions. So did anybody got arrested (like Burma) or one party got 99.% of the votes like in Iraq? No. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad got 62.63% and Mir-Hossein Mousavi got 33.75%. Are there supporters of Mousavi who weren’t happy that Ahmadinejad got elected, probably. But should we ignore that Ahmadinejad had clearly won? no? And what does this have to do with ‘elections’ in China? Troll.

March 11, 2010 @ 5:43 am | Comment

“Exactly, from that article, you seem to blame China on problems in Iran.”
How is that baming China for the outpourings of people in Iranian cities?

“So did anybody got arrested (like Burma)”
Aung San Suu Kyi
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aung_San_Suu_Kyi
“1990 general election
In 1990, the military junta called a general election, which the National League for Democracy won by an overwhelming 82% of the votes. Being the NLD’s candidate, Aung San Suu Kyi under normal circumstances would have assumed the office of Prime Minister.[23] Instead, the results were nullified, and the military refused to hand over power. This resulted in an international outcry. Aung San Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest at her home on University Avenue (16°49′32″N 96°9′1″E / 16.82556°N 96.15028°E / 16.82556; 96.15028) in Rangoon. During her arrest, she was awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought in 1990, and the Nobel Peace Prize the year after. Her sons Alexander and Kim accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on her behalf. Aung San Suu Kyi used the Nobel Peace Prize’s 1.3 million USD prize money to establish a health and education trust for the Burmese people.[24]”
and
“On 11 August 2009 the trial concluded with Suu Kyi being sentenced to imprisonment for three years with hard labour. This sentence was commuted by the military rulers to further house arrest of eighteen months.[80] On 14 August, U.S. Senator Jim Webb visited Burma, visiting with junta leader Gen. Than Shwe and later with Suu Kyi. During the visit, Webb negotiated Yettaw’s release and deportation from Burma.[81] Following the verdict of the trial, lawyers of Suu Kyi said, they would appeal against the 18-months sentence.[82] On 18 August, United States President Barack Obama asked the country’s military leadership to set free all political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi.[83] In her appeal, Aung San Suu Kyi had argued, that the conviction was unwarranted. However, her appeal against the August sentence was rejected by a Burmese court on 2 October, 2009, although the court accepted the argument that the 1974 constitution, under which she had been charged, was null and void, but said the provisions of the 1975 security law, under which she has been kept under house arrest, remained in force. The verdict effectively means, she will be unable to participate in elections scheduled to take place in 2010 – the first in Burma in two decades. Her lawyer stated that her legal team would pursue a new appeal within 60 days. [84]”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/2331951.stm

Who reported the election results in Iran? Ooooh, it was the mullahs…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_presidential_election,_2009
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE55C0W620090613
“KARIM SADJAPOUR, ANALYST AT CARNEGIE ENDOWMENT FOR

INTERNATIONAL PEACE:

“I don’t think anyone anticipated this level of fraudulence. This was a selection, not an election. At least authoritarian regimes like Syria and Egypt have no democratic pretences. In retrospect it appears this entire campaign was a show: (Supreme Leader) Ayatollah (Ali) Khamenei wasn’t ever going to let Ahmadinejad lose.””

Damn, you are so dense at times that…..oh fuck it – like discussing genetics with a brick…

March 11, 2010 @ 6:01 am | Comment

In that case, why does this theocratic state have an election in the first place

In the first place, what kind of elections is this when those who want to run for the presidency have to be approved by the Council of Guardians?

March 11, 2010 @ 10:27 am | Comment

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.