“A toothpick is still a toothpick”

I’m not saying another word. Go over to China Geeks to read more. Headline is semi-not-work-safe.

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Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 24 Comments

One of my favourite mainstream inter-racial sex education movies was the hit 1970s film “Mandingo”.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkR4-n4b7gg

April 13, 2009 @ 8:17 pm | Comment

I once had lunch with an American woman who, I believe, now works for the US State Department who said that “all American men in China have ‘Yellow Fever’.”

April 13, 2009 @ 8:35 pm | Comment

“I once had lunch with an American woman who …said that “all American men in China have ‘Yellow Fever’.””

And, pray tell, what malady inflicts the Chinese women who seek them out with such alacrity?

While you’re pushing the stereotype of ‘foreign men behaving badly in China’, perhaps you would like to inform us who the worst offenders are. I’m guessing the French because they were naughty with those sexy statues and the DL. Then again, maybe it really is those Yankee boys. As we Brits used to say about the American GIs during WW2: over-paid, over-sexed, and over here.

April 14, 2009 @ 2:51 am | Comment

“And, pray tell, what malady inflicts the Chinese women who seek them out with such alacrity?”

In the past I’ve suggested appropriating the term “白血病”

April 14, 2009 @ 8:41 am | Comment

“As we Brits used to say about the American GIs during WW2: over-paid, over-sexed, and over here.

I thought it was: “If it weren’t for you blokes, we’d all have to get cracking on our German lessons.”

And yes, I’m joking.

April 14, 2009 @ 8:43 am | Comment

What’s the difference between “Jungle Fever”, and “Yellow Fever”?

What about the disease that describes the lusting after short, powerful, Sichuanese blokes called “Dengue Fever”?

Most of the Brits seem to like the Filippinas, who seem to be brown. Is there such a thing as “Brown Fever”? Mick Jagger sings about the Brits love of “Brown Sugar”.

April 14, 2009 @ 9:23 am | Comment

all American men in China have ‘Yellow Fever’.

That’s unfair. American men in China don’t have a large pool of non-”yellow” women to choose from.

As an Australian man who no longer lives in China but still has a thing for red-hot, smokin’ Chinese girls, it could be said that I have “yellow fever”.

Although, and this goes without saying, as a normal hetero chap I’d shag a red-hot, smokin’ girl of any ethnic background.

Whether they’d shag me or not is a very different prospect.

April 14, 2009 @ 9:53 am | Comment

Peter Hessler talks about having a Chinese stalker. Not a very pleasant experience.
Brits also seem to like Thai women. Their behavior, manners and attire are appalling, at least in places like Bangkok and Phuket.

April 14, 2009 @ 11:25 am | Comment

“Their behavior, manners and attire are appalling, at least in places like Bangkok and Phuket.”

On the balance of my own experiences in those places I’d have to agree with you. I, on the other hand, was a model gentleman abroad; never touched a drop and never paid to touch anything else either.

Jeremiah, I’m ashamed to say that your term eludes me, and my translator is out. Care to elaborate?

April 14, 2009 @ 11:44 am | Comment

Sorry Stuart,

Here’s the crib:

It’s a bad joke (because it involves a serious disease, but then again, the actual Yellow Fever isn’t a walk in the park either) but “baixuebing” is the Chinese term for leukemia, literally: “White Blood Disease.”

April 14, 2009 @ 11:56 am | Comment

It was actually a guy that wrote that sick minded thing. He is a 32 years old guy from Zhejiang Jinhua.

I knew it was a fake story from the very beginning.

April 14, 2009 @ 12:03 pm | Comment

What does it mean when a Chinese girl looks at your “Thang” and exclaims: “Hen Kongbu!”?

April 14, 2009 @ 1:57 pm | Comment

That she’s afraid of exhibitionists running around with their trousers around their ankles?

April 14, 2009 @ 4:05 pm | Comment

Thang Long,

your “Thang” is very “Long”

April 14, 2009 @ 6:58 pm | Comment

The other day, I came across an old Chinese gentlemen who was half-blind and panhandling on the street.

I came him a few Rmb and struck up a conversation.

I asked the Old Timer if, when looking back on his life, he has any regrets?

He replied that he wished that he could’ve “…gotten as much ass as all those young Americans now in China.”

April 14, 2009 @ 7:51 pm | Comment

The following message appears as an introduction to the Form 1040 Instruction Booklet:

“Dear Taxpayer,
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. notably said “Taxes
are what we pay for civilized society.” We should be proud that the vast
majority of American citizens pay their taxes honestly and of their own free
will. In an ever more complex and global world, we cannot take for granted this
cornerstone principle of our democracy.
For the IRS’s part, we owe it to all taxpayers to make the process of paying
taxes as easy as possible. IRS employees are dedicated to helping taxpayers to
quickly get their questions answered, complete their forms, pay their taxes, and
get back to their lives. From the telephone representative who answers tax law
questions, to the walk-in site employees who help low-income taxpayers, to the
technicians that design and build our website – http://www.irs.gov – we are
committed to providing top quality service.
Unfortunately, there will always be some that cheat their fellow citizens by
avoiding the payment of their fair share of taxes. The IRS owes it to the
millions of you who promptly pay your taxes in full to pursue these people
through strong enforcement programs. I believe this is a basic matter of
fairness.
If you need more information about taxes, I hope you’ll visit us online at
http://www.irs.gov, or call us toll free at 1-800-829-1040. Your government works for
you, so please do not hesitate to contact us if you need help.
Sincerely,
Douglas H. Shulman
The IRS

April 14, 2009 @ 8:30 pm | Comment

?

April 15, 2009 @ 2:24 pm | Comment

I’m not sure what to say, richard!

Hope you guys had a good Easter by the way.

April 15, 2009 @ 5:06 pm | Comment

“I’m not sure what to say…”

Oh…There’s plenty say.

I’m now reading George Soros’ new book entitled “The Crash of 2008 and What It Means”.

At first, I was rather disappointed with the book as the book’s subject matter is Soros’ theory of Reflexivity, which is not what I expected from the title.

In any event, Soros basically says that not only are people delusional, but that information, the media and even public discourse has been hijacked for the purpose of manipulating people (including the financial markets) rather than in the pursuit of Truth via reason which is the historic mission of the Enlightenment. In other words, the financial crisis is akin to China’s Great Leap Forward, a mass delusional disaster, which is an outcome of the same delusional, manipulative thinking that brought us the Holocaust, the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union, the Iraq War, etc., etc. I’m adding content here for dramatic effect.

Actually, it’s a good book.

April 15, 2009 @ 7:05 pm | Comment

How come big-breasted Chinese women are all called “Bo Bo”?

April 15, 2009 @ 9:27 pm | Comment

@Stuart
“And, pray tell, what malady inflicts the Chinese women who seek them out with such alacrity?”

White fever?

April 15, 2009 @ 11:35 pm | Comment

Hhhmmm…. to be racial.. ooops ethnic neutral

Western fever?

April 15, 2009 @ 11:36 pm | Comment

What was the name of the prominent, Chinese academic who did a thorough study of American Fulbright professors lecturing in China on US Constitutionalism and rule-of-law issues?

Wasn’t it Professor We?

I think it was Professor We Fukem Young.

April 16, 2009 @ 11:52 am | Comment

I once met an American academic in China who was studying Confucianism.

It was weird as he had gone totally native, as they say.

He wore his hair in a Qing Dynasty queue, wore Confucian-style black jacket and pants, and donned Coke-bottle thick glasses.

When I asked him whether he enjoyed living in rural China, he replied: “I really like the young ‘Poothy’.”

April 16, 2009 @ 12:06 pm | Comment

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