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Hacked By AdGhosT

Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

Why Obama’s Victory Matters » The Peking Duck

Why Obama’s Victory Matters

[I just posted this as a comment to the thread below, and then decided it merited a post of its own. Let this be my way of saying goodnight on this great day for America, and the world.]

This is richard, burnt out after a long day. Thanks for all the comments. What we saw today was a tectonic shift, an entire new paradigm (pardon the cliché) of what America is, what it stands for and all that is possible when you give people freedom and democracy. I have a lot more to say, and will try to put up a post tomorrow summarizing all that I believe this election means. Simply put, the notion that America is a wonderful place, unlike any other on the planet in terms of hope and opportunity, has been restored.

I saw the great Chris Patten speak last weekend at the Foreign Correspondents Club of China, and he confessed that despite his reputation as a conservative, he was a proud “Obamamaniac” (he actually used that term). He explained it very simply: “Obama has made American politics respectable again.”

I want that to seep in. Something happened under Bush that we hadn’t seen before, something terrible and ugly. It wasn’t new or unique to Bush; indeed, it was Richard Nixon who first sowed the seeds, but it was under Bush that it blossomed and fully reared its head. And that is the tactic of not just pointing out where you and your enemies disagree, but to question the essence of their character, and to tie them to the most anti-American of forces. Nixon’s smearing of “the pink lady” Helen Gahagan Douglas was the first ominous sign of a whole new type of smear: claiming that your opponent is a Communist; in recent months, it was a terrorist-sympathizer, a sleeper-cell Muslim, a socialist-communist-Marxist. This evil technique lay dormant for some time after Watergate, but it never was abandoned. It relied on a fantasy, a big lie, but it worked wonders. Ronald Reagan’s stories of “welfare queens” (who did not exist) who were living high off the hog thanks to welfare, was an offshoot of this tactic of creating imaginary enemies and tying them to your opponent. Willie Horton was another example, playing on unspoken racist fears and creating an association of the opponent with madman black rapists and murderers.

It was only under Bush and Karl Rove and, inexplicably, the once-honorable McCain that this tactic reached its zenith. Just as with Willie Horton, the GOP spin-monsters created a psychological association between Obama and Muslim terrorists, marxists, vote fraudsters and even white terrorists or yesteryear. Just as with “the pink lady,” this was all nonsense, a total lie, and the Rove machine knew it. No matter; it worked wonders before with the Swift Boat Veterans and, irony of ironies, with the smearing of McCain himself in 2000.

That was a long way of describing why Patten’s words were so stirring. America has finally rejected big-lie smears. The most wonderful thing about this entire election has been that Obama turned the tables on the liars and rumor mongers, not by fighting fire with fire but by simply taking the high road. He never shouted or lost his temper, he never let the inane stories faze him. Instead he stuck to the issues and showed for the first time in years that a politician can speak to the public without invoking bogeymen or scare tactics, that he could communicate with the people at their level, about the real things that matter to them, not straw-man issues and murky allegations. He made politics respectable again. He changed the face of American politics and showed the world we are not a nation of self-deluded automatons who can be swayed to insanity by the snake-oil salesmen. And that leaves American politics in a very different place than it was just a few months ago. We can already feel it – America longs to be a kinder, gentler nation once again, to be respected by the world as a leader and a role model, not as a bully and a torturer.

I am not in America now, of course, but I urge you to see this post to get a feeling for just how palpable America’s joy and relief are. A great burden, an agony, has been lifted. We can breathe again, we can see light and we can have hope. As most of you know, Obama wasn’t my first choice, but I have seen what he can do and I am impressed. A shame that he now has to face the staggering mess Bush leaves in his wake, but I think most of us realize he can’t work miracles. He is not a messiah and no one except the right ever said, sneeringly, that he was. Let’s savor the victory for now, and then brace ourselves for a lot of hard, painful work that will need to be done to complete America’s transformation into a real country again, a country in which we can disagree with others without calling them terrorists or traitors, and in which we face the fact that we are all in this together. “God bless America,” as the somewhat hackneyed and overused expression goes. Somehow tonight, despite its inherent mawkishness, it seems appropriate.

______________

Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 76 Comments

Seems like the People’s Congress electing the Chinese President is somewhat similar to the Electoral College electing the US President.

November 6, 2008 @ 10:44 pm | Comment

I don’t totally disagree with you on certain of your points. I was just pointing at the irony of the situation.

I am not advocating the hegemony of any given system, but more let’s say, welcoming systems and ideas that comes from everywhere and not just from a bunch of self elevated and proclaimed elite class.

The best social experiment that represents this so far is the USA and Canada, and in the eyes of many, they are symbols and hopes of a good life.

This is my main point. Don’t you realize that these countries are an amalgam of many different visions from all around the world ? Do you wish that China becomes the equivalent of the hillbillies that lives secluded in the mountains, cut from the global reality and living in their own Chinese bubble ?

You are naive to think that the US influence is driven by white racist supremacists, very naive. We had conflicts in the past, many many conflicts, but the key point is that we are maturing, and day after day we are making it possible for different races, religions and beliefs to coexist together.

Your ethnocentric approach is a thing of the past now, like it or not. We as human evolve as a whole. Where we stand today reaches far beyond races and frontiers. And it’s just the beginning, so you better get used to it.

Your mentality is the perfect mirroring of the worse you can find here in China: Ultra-Selfishness and the “whatever happens outside of my very own reality is none of my business”, like watching a dead body on the floor, smoking cigarettes and casually discussing and waiting for somebody else to take care of the problem.

This is what I intended to write as my closing line:

Luckily this this kind of attitude is not the norm. Your mindset is on the list of the endangered species, but I don’t think anybody will lift a finger to rescue it.

But after reading your last post, I’ve come to a more honest and less incisive remark:

I’ve been living in China for many years, and I must admit that somehow it is challenging my past perception of our system. Strangely, I do see many advantages and benefits to having an authoritarian regime. I just feel sometimes that people are too dumb, and that in some occasions, it’s necessary to lead the mass.

But as the US has proven us recently, reason always prevail on the long run.

So, I can’t come with a definite answer to this right now. I’ll keep watching to see how the world evolves.

November 6, 2008 @ 10:49 pm | Comment

You do have some good points Mongol Warrior. But I hope that you could promote your beliefs in a way that sounds less like “China and Chinese people don’t give a shit about the rest of the world”.

Who knows, the future might be a combination of both our models. It’s quite possible…

November 6, 2008 @ 11:05 pm | Comment

Your mentality is the perfect mirroring of the worse you can find here in China: Ultra-Selfishness and the “whatever happens outside of my very own reality is none of my business”, like watching a dead body on the floor, smoking cigarettes and casually discussing and waiting for somebody else to take care of the problem.

Which was the way things were in America only 50 or 60 years ago – a function of a nations stage of development. Just watch any documentary on the Hoover dam – attitudes then similar to those in China today. And in any case your analogy is completely wrong. I’m all for nations rendering humanitarian aid to victims of cyclones, earthquakes. Nothing wrong with providing help in building up a poor country’s infracstructure, helping out with agriculture, clean drinking water. That is good intervention.

But it is altogether a different thing to to into another country and dictate to the people there the way they should run their country, that they should embrace Hollywood, feminism and the two party system.

I will help my neighbour out if his house catches fire, but I will refrain from dictating to him how he should raise his children.

You are naive to think that the US influence is driven by white racist supremacists, very naive Not my view at all – especially in light of Obamas election.

I just feel sometimes that people are too dumb, and that in some occasions, it’s necessary to lead the mass.

Unfortunately this is true. Without a numerically strong educated middle class with good civic virtues, democracy is just who can offer the biggest bribe. In the West it use to be only people with property who could vote. While this was certainly unfair, property owners would generally have been better educated than those without property. In fact those without property would most likely have been illiterate. China still has a long way to go before it has a population ready for Western style democracy. And in the end who really cares – certainly not 99.999% of Chinese people I know. And if they are happy with the way things are then that should be enough.

November 6, 2008 @ 11:11 pm | Comment

“Which was the way things were in America only 50 or 60 years ago”

No, I agree with you, I once made an analogy about this phenomenon in China, I also do think that there are similarities, only shifted a couple of decades apart.

So let’s say our vision is not so different: Why is there one side of you that speaks like a pro-china fanatic and why do you use such terms as Yellow race, etc ?

You are sending a mixed message and I am curious to understand your thinking. One side sounds like red Star and the other side makes sense and is rational.

?

November 6, 2008 @ 11:18 pm | Comment

But don’t you have any empathy for other human beings suffering atrocities outside of China?

I mean, basic human rights, such as the right to keep your body and your genital organs intact, the right to live your life the way you want, the right to be homosexual, the right to choose your religion, etc.

It’s a personal view, but for me I choose to try to change the reality of people in terrible situation into something better.

Right now in the US this is what is happening, people feel like they can change the world for the better. It might not be the agenda of the politicians, but I am sure it’s in the heart of the people. Why do you think a majority of these people are against the Iraq war ? Just because they don’t want to fight and they are sad about their loss (of course this is one reason)? Or because they know it’s a big fat lie and it’s just creating a mountain of shame on them and their nation ?

Did you see the people crying, me included, when they realized the impact of the symbolic meaning of having a black president in America while listening to Obama’s speech? It’s not just guilt from the past, it is hope, hope for a better future that doesn’t exclude anyone.

We are all in the same boat, so my hope tonight is that our discussion can help you promote this message. And it actually does influence me for doing so as well.

November 6, 2008 @ 11:36 pm | Comment

Mongol warrior,

And in the end who really cares – certainly not 99.999% of Chinese people I know

Of course you will never know how many Chinese care about it. There is only one way to find out — ask them, ie have a democracy!

November 6, 2008 @ 11:42 pm | Comment

Mongol Warrior,

But it is altogether a different thing to to into another country and dictate to the people there the way they should run their country

If you think China doesn’t promote its system abroad you don’t understand China’s foreign policy. China definitely supports communist parties in Nepal, India and many other countries with money etc (illegally I might add). Can you please ask China to stop interfering in the internal affairs of other countries before you ask Westerners to do the same in China.

November 6, 2008 @ 11:45 pm | Comment

I am always amazed by people like Mongol Warrior, who have absolutely no say in how their country is run (they cannot vote, cannot advocate for changes etc.), but at the same time support like automations whatever policy the current politbureau decrees.

November 7, 2008 @ 12:02 am | Comment

Absolute power corrupts absolutely. This concern was one motivation the founding fathers had for providing checks on the elements of the american system of government. Even good men with the best of intentions when given absolute power to do whatever they want with no accountability eventually go too far. Unfortunately in China there appears to be some acceptance or belief that some level of corruption in government is an acceptable entitlement of government officials. Also there the confucian philosophy and belief of viewing national leaders as “fathers” requiring filial piety from the “sons and daughters” who are their citizens puts the leaders in a position where the absolute power eventually corrupts them. Hu Jin Tao has some good attributes and has leadership abilities, but unfortunately his a man and fallible like all men are. So being in a position of absolute power it seems hard to believe that he has not been or will eventually be corrupted in some way, especially since it seems the people of china accept that powerful leaders are entitled to mistresses, kickbacks, bribes, some skim off the top, favorable business deals, etc.

I think this is one area that modern china has not yet figured out how to contend with. Currently the government does claim to be trying to fight corruption, but when they view their own personal “corruption” as an entitlement then they have compromised their own morality.

Using the rule of law to government men to prevent good men from becoming corrupt and to punish those who are corrupt is the path western cultures have taken. asian cultures believe in the cultivation of virtue in the individual instead of the use of law to punish the corrupt. Both ideas have merit. Western culture could do more to teach ideals of virtue, but asian cultures must also accept that man is fallible and that it is necessary to have appropriate laws and rules, transparency, checks and balances so that men are not tempted. Once a government official has accepted one bribe or accepted the idea that it is an entitlement then he has become corrupted and his judgement suspect. Also after accepting a bribe no matter how trivial then someone has a hold over him with potential to influence his decisions.

Hu Jin Tao has some good qualities but he most likely at somepoint in his career received a bribe, skimmed some money off the top, paid some kickback or accepted one, used his position to influence a business deal for a friend or relative, or had mistresses. Of course he is entitled after all he is the CCP’s huangdi.

This is the achilles heel of China’s government.

November 7, 2008 @ 1:09 am | Comment

If you think China doesn’t promote its system abroad you don’t understand China’s foreign policy. China definitely supports communist parties in Nepal, India and many other countries with money etc (illegally I might add).

MT. Not even China’s worst detractors accuse them of this. Absolute BS. The communists in Nepal (the Maoists – there are actually two factions – one Maoist – one Cuban leaning) received not a dime from China. In fact Maoists parties the world over consider the current Chinese government to be renegrades and reactionaries. And China has no interest anymore in promoting international revolution. You are 40 years out of date MT.

Interesting fact is of course the Nepalese Maoists were elected into power last year, and the Indian communists also take part in the parliamentary process of their country.

Anyone here with even the most basic understanding of Chinese affairs would recognize your statement to be absolutely absurd.

MT: Worse you obviously made it up. Otherwise please provide links to backup your assertion.

November 7, 2008 @ 5:38 am | Comment

I mean, basic human rights, such as the right to keep your body and your genital organs intact, the right to live your life the way you want, the right to be homosexual, the right to choose your religion, etc.

Oab- different cultures, different people have different ideas of what will best promote happiness. You may for instance think that a women who is veiled is oppressed. And in one sense you would be right. But one could also argue that women in the West are also oppressed because they are mostly judged by their looks and not their abilities. They are in fact simply seen as sexual objects. Look at the Palin phenomenon. This was a woman who would never have got close to even being a factory floor supervisor had she not been considered ‘hot’ – let alone contender for Vice president of the US. Her appeal was 90% the fact that she is considered ‘hot.’ Is that a good thing?

For me homosexuality is a thing for two adults to decide. And it does not bother me the sexual orientation of a complete stranger. But if some countries, like Iran, consider it to be anathema then that is their right. And the vast majority of Iranians, I guess, are happy with things this way. The right for the majority of Iranians to live in a society that reflects their religious beliefs, that reflects their values, trumps the right of a small minority to offend same majority.

And the right for a Falun Gong to practice his beliefs may not be as important as the need for the Chinese people to avoid the massive de-stabilization and chaos and civil strife and human suffering that has occurred in the past caused by very similar sorts of cults.

November 7, 2008 @ 5:56 am | Comment

It’s a personal view, but for me I choose to try to change the reality of people in terrible situation into something better.

I agree. But massive suffering in the world is happening right now and this is caused by extreme poverty. No other nation in recent years has done as much as China in uplfiting hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. Poverty alleviation is the greatest contribution any Third world government (or indeed first world government) can do to relieve suffering. And it is what 99.99% of the Chinese people care about most. China is doing this better than any other developing nation on the face of the earth. Poor people have more of a chance in China than poor people in India.

I would guess that never in human history have so many people had their lives improved in so short a period of time, as has happened in China these past two decades.

November 7, 2008 @ 6:27 am | Comment

…he most likely at somepoint in his career received a bribe, skimmed some money off the top, paid some kickback or accepted one, used his position to influence a business deal for a friend or relative, or had mistresses.

Lindel: sure you aren’t speaking of Bill Clinton???

November 7, 2008 @ 7:49 am | Comment

The world’s gone MAD!

Rush Limbaugh is now pushing the right-wing, Republican Governor of Louisiana, Bobby Jindal, as a possible future “savior” of the Republican “Cause”. Dig this—Jindal is an ethnic Indian. The world has gone MAD!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Jindal

November 7, 2008 @ 8:39 am | Comment

Mongol, where/when/from whom did Clinton ever receive a bribe? I’m getting a little tired of you and your playing fast and loose with your “facts.” Your comment above about moral relativism sickened me. Like, it’s okay for people to stone their 12=year-old daughters to death for the crime of being raped because that’s part of their “culture.” Some things are non-negotiable and flat-out wrong no matter what culture you’re in. If you don’t accept that, then absolutely anything goes. And as part of this blog’s culture, ignoramuses like you get banned. That’s just a warning. Please think before you comment.

November 7, 2008 @ 9:05 am | Comment

Like, it’s okay for people to stone their 12=year-old daughters to death for the crime of being raped because that’s part of their “culture.”

Never heard of something like that. You have a source?

Have heard of adulterers getting death. Not pleasant. Would not personally agree with such practices. But how safe are Iranian streets compared with the streets of Detroit? What is the teenage pregnancy rate in Iran compared with Chicago?

And do Iranian teenagers carry out car-jackings in baggy trousers while listening to gangster rap?

November 7, 2008 @ 10:07 am | Comment

MW,

Dude, it’s called honor killing, look it up dude, it’s sick…This happened awhile ago in Afghanistan (I’m sorry, maybe somewhere else) where someone who was rapped was in TURN RAPED by a bunch of ***ks and killed!!! That’s just EVIL…

November 7, 2008 @ 4:06 pm | Comment

For me homosexuality is a thing for two adults to decide. And it does not bother me the sexual orientation of a complete stranger. But if some countries, like Iran, consider it to be anathema then that is their right. And the vast majority of Iranians, I guess, are happy with things this way. The right for the majority of Iranians to live in a society that reflects their religious beliefs, that reflects their values, trumps the right of a small minority to offend same majority.

The right of a majority to be “undisturbed” by the existence of a group of non-offending people doesn’t supercede the right of various individuals to exist. You have to weigh cost/benefit. You shouldn’t be stoning random people to solve a collective psychological disorder; it creates dysfunctional societies. Even more so than the stuff that’s done in America.

November 7, 2008 @ 4:50 pm | Comment

The right of a majority to be “undisturbed” by the existence of a group of non-offending people doesn’t supercede the right of various individuals to exist.

Agree with you here. But at the same time it doesn’t really bother me how Iranians run Iran – whatever customs and folkways they have that is their business.

November 7, 2008 @ 5:12 pm | Comment

Buck — I’ve been talking about Bobby Jindal for a year, and months on this PK blog. Inshallah, he will be elected US president in 2016.

I have a friend who works in his administration. He is a fine person with a keen mind.

November 7, 2008 @ 11:41 pm | Comment

He has some interesting opinions about women’s reproductive rights.

November 7, 2008 @ 11:48 pm | Comment

Some Chinese views about Pr Obama

http://tinyurl.com/5a9k5z

November 8, 2008 @ 5:07 pm | Comment

Agree with you here. But at the same time it doesn’t really bother me how Iranians run Iran – whatever customs and folkways they have that is their business.

Executing people for stupid shit isn’t really disturbing as much as it is psychopathic. They should at least give them the chance to leave.

November 9, 2008 @ 7:51 am | Comment

Interesting how “many of those who said Barack Obama was anti-American or a friend of terrorists have been changing their tone” accoring to today’s NYTimes under the heading ‘Harsh Words About Obama? Never Mind Now.’ Talk about change!
.

November 9, 2008 @ 10:04 am | Comment

I never knew yogurt could come out my nose until I read Mongol saying “China has never had the hegemonic ambition and desire to control others that the West has always had.”

Seriously. That one was a shocker.

I’d love to deliver a rebuttal to the “electing a CEO” fallacy. I’ll do that when I can get the dairy product out of my nasal cavity.

November 10, 2008 @ 12:08 am | Comment

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