“She’ll grow into the job”

From the latest Couric interview with Palin. Heh.

KATIE COURIC: “What happens if the goal of democracy doesn’t produce the desired outcome? In Gaza, the U.S. pushed hard for elections and Hamas won.”

SARAH PALIN: “Yeah, well especially in that region, though, we have to protect those who do seek democracy and support those who seek protections for the people who live there. What we’re seeing in the last couple of days here in New York is a President of Iran, Ahmadinejad, who would come on our soil and express such disdain for one of our closest allies and friends, Israel … and we’re hearing the evil that he speaks and if hearing him doesn’t allow Americans to commit more solidly to protecting the friends and allies that we need, especially there in the Mideast, then nothing will.”

Yes, just the kind of incisive, penetrating mind we need to deal with the most complex, most fragile moment in America’s entire history. President Palin. Horrifying. Literally horrifying.

______________

Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 42 Comments

I thought GW was hard to understand. Is it my poor English or is her answer unintelligible?

September 30, 2008 @ 10:32 pm | Comment

That’s the point. And she is, without realizing it, endorsing Hamas.

September 30, 2008 @ 11:38 pm | Comment

I think she would grow into the job, but that’s because the job of Vice President doesn’t entail much. Anyway, she won’t have the chance so it’s academic. Would be fun to watch if she did, though. Dick has been too boring.

And she is, without realizing it, endorsing Hamas.

Not really – she just didn’t bother addressing the point.

I wonder how much coverage the VP debate will get (maybe very little with the failure of the bailout). It will be entertaining to see who “wins” – probably the candidate who says the least (Palin because her responses to questions are terrible and Biden because he keeps putting his foot in his mouth).

October 1, 2008 @ 2:40 am | Comment

What really amazes me is that Katie Couric has acquired gravitas.

October 1, 2008 @ 2:57 am | Comment

What really amazes me is that Katie Couric has acquired gravitas.

What did she cover before – bake sales? :D

October 1, 2008 @ 3:06 am | Comment

“I think she would grow into the job, but that’s because the job of Vice President doesn’t entail much. ”

Raj, obviously you were under a rock in the past 8 years. Honestly, Raj, just give up. You sound as smart as Mrs Palin. And that might be an insult depending on who you ask.

“I wonder how much coverage the VP debate will get (maybe very little with the failure of the bailout). ”

Let me assure you that the Thursday debate will get the highest rating ever for a VP debate.

October 1, 2008 @ 3:08 am | Comment

Raj, obviously you were under a rock in the past 8 years.

No, I just have a very selective interest in US politics given I’m not American – and I can’t remember the last time I saw Dick.

October 1, 2008 @ 4:13 am | Comment

But really, I know that the VP has “things to do”. But I’m not sure that an inexperienced VP is of itself a problem – unless one is as sure as Richard that McCain will drop dead within the first year or so (which I’m not).

October 1, 2008 @ 4:16 am | Comment

“But really, I know that the VP has “things to do”. But I’m not sure that an inexperienced VP is of itself a problem – unless one is as sure as Richard that McCain will drop dead within the first year or so (which I’m not).”

Even if McCain doesn’t die, what does it say about a man who stands such a comparatively high chance of dying in office if he chooses a running mate he’d met only one time before her selection? A running mate with, by appearances, absolutely no experience or knowledge necessary for the job in the middle of one of the most tumultous and potentially disastrous periods in modern American history? And does so, almost flagrantly, not because he really thinks she’ll be a great Vice President, but because he knows she’ll rally the mouth-breathing Bible thumpers and possibly some of the truly dumbest Clintonites to vote for him?

Picking a Vice President is part politics, admittedly, but it’s also a reflection of your judgement. In that particular test, McCain has revealed that he is willing to gamble with the country’s future for the sake of his own political campaign. In that sense, Palin is important, whether McCain dies on his first night in the White House or lives until he’s 90.

October 1, 2008 @ 7:39 am | Comment

The vice-presidency is “not worth a bucket of warm piss.” –John Nance Garner — vice president

October 1, 2008 @ 7:41 am | Comment

Raj

“No, I just have a very selective interest in US politics given I’m not American – and I can’t remember the last time I saw Dick.”

Then you should just sit down and let those who knows what’s going on have a conversation, will ya?

And even if McCain survives his skin cancer, what if he goes senile in 2 years? Who’s going to run the business?

October 1, 2008 @ 8:02 am | Comment

So democratic allies need protecting against threatening states, be they democratic or non-democratic. That’s her response in a nutshell, though I admit her expression is poor.

While I strongly disagree with the utopian idea that you can export democracy to all other countries, regardless of their level of economic development, culture, history, etc., Palin holds views that are shared by many of us Americans. Of course, any attempt to export our system of political economy to developing countries like Iraq is just plain foolish, and ultimately very destructive. We are now starting to pay the financial price for our greed in trying to better secure oil under the guise of spreading democracy, because not only did the project fail, resulting in a more insecure supply (which we’re now paying for at the gas station) but our debt has also ballooned. Our economy is now on the verge of going bust, it seems.

It’s most definitely time for a change of government.

October 1, 2008 @ 8:07 am | Comment

This was her typical birdbrained answer to a complex question with a bunch of mangled talking points which, when brought together, become meaningless – and worse. Obviously she didn’t mean to endorse Hamas but her response to a question specifically about Hamas begins with the words ““Yeah, well especially in that region, though, we have to protect those who do seek democracy.” Hamas sought democracy. They attained power and legitimacy through democracy. Do we need to protect Hamas?

McCain is old and has been sick. It is not at all unreasonable to worry about him being out of commission for a while or to even die – people die; it is not unprecedented and the odds go up the older you get. I know, a revelation.

Since 1945, we have seen FOUR VPs step into the president’s shoes: Truman, Johnson, Gerald Ford, Bush I, all due to the death, impeachment or attempted assassination of the president. (Bush I was briefly in charge after the Reagan assassination attempt.) It is not unprecedented.

The very idea of Palin selecting our supreme court justices should make everyone’s hair stand on end. It is a huge risk.

I never said I expect McCain to die on the job, but it is enough within the realm of possibility to make the phrase “a heartbeat away from the presidency” unusually relevant.

More examples of birdbrainism at work here. The other day Raj said Biden’s gaffes were as bad and I requested to see a couple of the ones that were this staggering and left doubts as to the man’s most basic ability to construct thoughts and speak a sentence, That’s what we are seeing here. An empty vessel, a marketing concept designed to add some juice to a sputtering campaign, a “cool idea” gone awry – a catastrophe.

Luckily for all of us, Palin has scared away the independents. True, she has strengthened McCain’s support among the right-wing Evangelical base, but this race is all about winning those people in the middle – “Reagan Democrats,” liberal Republicans like Sam, moderates. She, coupled with McCain’s deranged handling of the bailout bill, has sealed Obama’s victory. Mission Accomplished, as our codpiece in chief would say.

October 1, 2008 @ 8:16 am | Comment

- “The very idea of Palin selecting our supreme court justices should make everyone’s hair stand on end.” -

Agree! She’s just another sexist, homophobic, racist, ignorant Christian fundamentalist who would be diastrous for this country.

But hey, we do live in a democracy (of sorts). Voting her into power would be analogous to the voting in of Hamas. Democracy is mob rule, remember, as someone very famous once said, and mobs always suffer, “for they know not what they do,” as Slavoj Zizek says.

October 1, 2008 @ 8:34 am | Comment

Just one question:

Is democracy a mean or an end?

My guess is that to Palin and Bush, democracy, like many other good-sounding principles, is an end itself.

It has too be achieved no matter the costs or the outcomes.

So, Hamas could be the good guy so long as they fought for democracy.

It is both entertaining and sad to see people reduce complex issues into slogans for the sake of his/her political campaign.

Simple slogans sell

October 1, 2008 @ 12:35 pm | Comment

Yes, and there’s one slogan that will sell best of all this year: It’s the economy, stupid! That’s an area where McCain doesn’t have a leg to stand on, especially in light of how he and his fellow Republicans handled the US bankruptcy plan earlier in the week. The public was not pleased. At least Palin demonstrated a deep insight into the heart of the problem:

That’s why I say I, like every American I’m speaking with, we’re ill about this position that we have been put in. Where it is the taxpayers looking to bail out. But ultimately, what the bailout does is help those who are concerned about the health care reform that is needed to help shore up our economy. Um, helping, oh, it’s got to be about job creation, too.

Sweet. But no worries, she can grow into being king of the world.

October 1, 2008 @ 2:04 pm | Comment

@A chinese

Democracy is a mean not an end in itself.

But… well, sometimes it leads to strange ends, like now in US. ;-)

It is not a perfect system of government. But the advantage of not being perfect a perfect system, is that things are easier to change, fix, update and replace.
In a “perfect” system, theocratic or ideological, things are not so easy to change. Usually it requires good deal of damage,.. most of the time.

October 1, 2008 @ 2:04 pm | Comment

@A Chinese
And do not panic yet. Elections are still to be held.

Have some confidence on the good sense of a majority of US voters. ;-)
(I hope…. )

October 1, 2008 @ 2:08 pm | Comment

It’s highly doubtful Palin has an idea what Hamas is. Quite possibly that’s the first time she ever heard the name.

Brilliant question by Katie Couric. Well, actually not exactly a stroke of genius, but it has to be answered by every U.S. politician who has a stake in foreign policy. Do you promote democracy universally or the just the ones of our likings?

October 1, 2008 @ 2:29 pm | Comment

^^ “every U.S. politician” — make it every politician in the West (a la *free world*)

October 1, 2008 @ 2:34 pm | Comment

Do you promote democracy universally or the just the ones of our likings?

Perhaps you can wheedle out of it by saying that Hamas is using democracy as a screen and isn’t commited to it…..

October 1, 2008 @ 3:16 pm | Comment

Then you should just sit down and let those who knows what’s going on have a conversation, will ya?

I don’t exactly see a ringing endorsement from everyone else on the crucial nature of the job of VP.

And even if McCain survives his skin cancer, what if he goes senile in 2 years? Who’s going to run the business?

What if Biden goes senile – who’s going to take over if something happens to Obama?

October 1, 2008 @ 3:19 pm | Comment

That’s an area where McCain doesn’t have a leg to stand on, especially in light of how he and his fellow Republicans handled the US bankruptcy plan earlier in the week. The public was not pleased.

Of course – the Democrats came out with 100% support of the project and Pelosi gave a rousing bi-partisan speech. The public wasn’t happy with the Democrats either.

she can grow into being king of the world

I thought that the Vice Presidency was “not worth a bucket of warm piss.”

Richard, if you’re so confident that McCain will keel over, place a bet on it and tell us what you put on, at what odds, etc.

October 1, 2008 @ 3:29 pm | Comment

I don’t know if you saw this or not, but it might interest you:

Computer Generated Sarah Palin Interview Answers
(at http://interviewpalin.com/)

Here’s one gem:
Q: What is your foreign policy experience?

A: I say I, like every American I’m speaking with, we’re ill about this position that we work with our allies to help us, diplomatic pressure. We need to implement those. We cannot just concede that, oh, gee, maybe they’re going to continue good relations with Saakashvili there. I was not a good relationship with them. They’re very, very appropriate role in the sense of the adverse impacts all across our nation, again, because the fundamentals, as he was having to explain afterwards, he means the ingenuity of the status quo, going with the energy independence that I’ve been working on for these years as the maverick though.

October 1, 2008 @ 3:48 pm | Comment

Thanks for that, Jayce.

Raj, please never put words in my mouth. I never, ever said I was sure McCain would keel over. Can you read? From above – from a few comments above; repeat, from above in this very thread:

McCain is old and has been sick. It is not at all unreasonable to worry about him being out of commission for a while or to even die – people die; it is not unprecedented and the odds go up the older you get. I know, a revelation. Since 1945, we have seen FOUR VPs step into the president’s shoes: Truman, Johnson, Gerald Ford, Bush I, all due to the death, impeachment or attempted assassination of the president. (Bush I was briefly in charge after the Reagan assassination attempt.) It is not unprecedented….

I never said I expect McCain to die on the job, but it is enough within the realm of possibility to make the phrase “a heartbeat away from the presidency” unusually relevant.

Are you really determined to convince us all that you are denser than a neutron star?

I remind readers that in a previous thread Raj said examples of Palin’s perennial bimboisity like the ones Jayce and I and others have cited don’t matter because Palin will “grow into the job.” Using that incredible logic, we can pick absolutely anyone for the office. No training, no brains, no experience necessary. Just show you’re perky, or at least that your CAT scan is showing some brain-wave activity, and you’re all set to go for VP because you can grow into it.

No. The reason everyone watches the selection of vice president is because it reflects the way the presidential nominee thinks, the level of risk he is willing to take, his ability to make a sound decision and demonstrate his sincerity in caring for the country. Obama’s choice disappointed me but it was indeed a reflection of who he is – a little too cautious, somewhat more centrist and conservative than a lot of us were hoping for, but certainly within the mainstream, somewhat center-left. McCain’s choice on the other hand was an unmitigated disaster. Bat-shit insane. When the one thing hysterical righties can say about her stupidity is, “she’ll grow into the job, don’t worry,” we all know something has gone dreadfully wrong. This is the vice president, the person who rules America and, in effect, the world if the president goes for surgery or, heaven forbid, dies, as have many other presidents in office.

Seriously Raj, just look at all your supporters on this one, just like with the UK Guardian post you wrote a couple of weeks ago saying outsiders shouldn’t tell Americans who to vote for. You’re out on a limb all by yourself, and David Brooks and George Will and even several of the writers at National Review and Weekly Standard all agree with the rest of us: Palin is an atrocious choice. You have said we should let her off the hook because “she’ll grow into the job.” Do you stand by that? Do you stand by the notion that we can overlook any flaws and proof of stupidity in our potential president because they can grow into the job later? I’ve never heard of such a thing, but maybe you have a new and daring paradigm for how we should select our leaders. Are you saying there are no criteria we should expect Palin to live up to, such as the ability to talk, because she can learn how to do it later?

About the bucket – that was Sam’s line, not mine. Again, are you reading before you comment? I would never say something that misguided, though I’m sure Sam’s heart was in the right place.

Yes, denser than a neutron star.

October 1, 2008 @ 4:28 pm | Comment

Further proof, just in:

“Couric: And when it comes to establishing your worldview, I was curious, what newspapers and magazines did you regularly read before you were tapped for this to stay informed and to understand the world?
Palin: I’ve read most of them, again with a great appreciation for the press, for the media.

Couric: What, specifically?

Palin: Um, all of them, any of them that have been in front of me all these years.

Couric: Can you name a few?

Palin: I have a vast variety of sources where we get our news, too. Alaska isn’t a foreign country, where it’s kind of suggested, “Wow, how could you keep in touch with what the rest of Washington, D.C., may be thinking when you live up there in Alaska?” Believe me, Alaska is like a microcosm of America.”

Yep, presidential material of the highest order.

In the same interview, she actually said this: “I’m not going to solely blame all of man’s activities on changes in climate.” Do you believe it. (Sadly, yes.)

October 1, 2008 @ 4:29 pm | Comment

Jason Lee, you might be better off attributing your “for they know not what they do” to Jesus.

October 1, 2008 @ 4:53 pm | Comment

This guy reminded me again why he is one of my favourite columnists on international affairs. He is spot on and he makes no effort at all to smoothen what he has to say. Watch the video.

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/americas/09/29/zakaria.sarah.palin/index.html

Oh, and is Gaza visible from Alaska ? No ? Damn, bad luck for Palin to run into exactly such a question …

October 1, 2008 @ 7:11 pm | Comment

I never said I expect McCain to die on the job, but it is enough within the realm of possibility to make the phrase “a heartbeat away from the presidency” unusually relevant.

Ok, so you think it’s enough of a possibility. Personally I don’t think it’s enough of a possibility.

Are you really determined to convince us all that you are denser than a neutron star?

Richard, for someone who complains when people use words “idiot” (I think that was the one) to describe other posters, aren’t you failing to practice what you preach? I don’t mind you making comments like that, but it would be nice if you set an example.

Using that incredible logic, we can pick absolutely anyone for the office. No training, no brains, no experience necessary. Just show you’re perky, or at least that your CAT scan is showing some brain-wave activity, and you’re all set to go for VP because you can grow into it.

I don’t see that Obama has training or much experience for the post of President. He has brains, sure, but working in the community (or whatever it was) means nothing. Palin is nowhere as experienced as Biden, but she has SOME experience of government/administration.

When the one thing hysterical righties can say about her stupidity is, “she’ll grow into the job, don’t worry,”

Richard just because someone doesn’t support your Palin/McCain views doesn’t make them a “hysterical righty”. I suppose it’s better than you calling me a Republican, but it’s not far off. Personally I think I’m further towards the centre than you are.

Are you saying there are no criteria we should expect Palin to live up to, such as the ability to talk, because she can learn how to do it later?

Palin can talk, but clearly has been out of her depth whilst being interviewed. I’m sure you’re convinced that’s because she’s unsuitable for high political office, but I wouldn’t say that of someone based on such interviews. I know those who are exceptionally bright but freeze when they do interviews (and had the same problem with exams). Not to suggest Palin is bright, but her failures with interviews do not make her an idiot or otherwise unsuitable to do the job.

I’ve read comments that the GOP could be over-compensating and crushing her under too much coaching. That could be an excuse, but maybe she’d feel more comfortable if she was “herself”.

I would definitely agree that so far she has been a bad choice, but that’s politically in regards to the chances of boosting McCain’s campaign. I have no idea what went through McCain’s head when he picked her – maybe he didn’t see much in her other than a way of appealing to Clinton supporters, or perhaps he thought he saw someone he could relate to (amongst other things).

When it comes to criteria, as I said before Obama’s record is patchy as well.
But really for the voters it comes down to who is the most eloquent and convincing. Obama is great at that – Palin terrible unless it’s scripted. I’m not sure that’s the best way how people should be elected to office, but it’s what happens.

About the bucket

Yes, I know you didn’t say it. I thought it was an amusing description of the post.

October 1, 2008 @ 7:33 pm | Comment

Palin is clearly in over her head and the shine is coming off in a big way, but I was thinking of the underlying fundamentals — what governor really has the experience and range it takes on a national and international stage? Does anyone know of one? Heaven knows I wouldn’t vote for my own state governor for anything on the national stage, and he has years more experience and many international trade missions under his belt. Bill Clinton faced the same questions, but is a brilliant mind, eloquent, and a quick learner. And he planned on the presidency since 30′s if not earlier.

It will be fun to watch the VP debate this week. I would be surprised if Palin embarrasses herself, as I was surprised McCain did not at the first debate. But if she does, so be it. BTW, Obama is wonderfully normal when not speaking from a teleprompter. By normal, I mean disfluent and sometimes disjoined, long-winded, and underwhelming (like regular mortals). He’s a different person when giving a speech, when he speaks the cadences of a Baptist preacher, which is very effective.

October 1, 2008 @ 8:11 pm | Comment

Matt, the bar has been set so low for Palin she almost has to come out better than we expect. But she can’t recover. All they need to do is play the Couric tapes in their ads. McCain is through and everyone knows it, thanks specifically to Palin. Fair points about Obama speaking off the cuff – he is okay, and sometimes he was excellent, but it’s night and day compared to when he has a prepared speech. That tends to be typical – Reagan was awful when he didn’t have a speech, a couple of good one-liners notwithstanding. Neither he nor Obama can compare to Bobby Kennedy or Martin Luther King. Or even to Bill Clinton, a marvelous speaker at all times, if a bit verbose.

Raj, sorry, but you’ve really blown my mind on this topic. To actually say she will grow into the job and that her idiocy doesn’t matter is beyond me. She could be president in an instant. Note the “could,” not “will” – but there is a damned good chance. It is truly unfathomable.

You keep going back to Obama’s lack of experience. We are not talking about experience. That is another, valid conversation. We are talking about being a total, unmitigated, bat-shit crazy, tongues-speaking idiot. We are talking about the ability to speak a complete sentence. You tend to get everything bass-ackwards. Case in point:

Palin can talk, but clearly has been out of her depth whilst being interviewed. I’m sure you’re convinced that’s because she’s unsuitable for high political office,

Wrong. It is the exact opposite. She is not out of her depth because she’s unsuitable for high office. She is unsuitable for high office because she is so totally out of her depth (at least in the presence of anyone with a minimal amount of grey matter). This is my objection to Palin – she has the mind of an insect on crack, or at least that’s how she comes across (with all due respect to insects). Everyone here gets this, George Will and National Review and David Brooks – they all get it. All we are talking about here is speaking. Nothing else. There is no comparison with Obama because the man can speak. That is priority No. 1 – the ability to communicate. Having that ability in and of itself doesn’t make a person worthy of being president, but without that ability (along with others) it is impossible. The job is all about communication. And the vice president is running for president, too; they may well have to serve in that position, and the odds favor that Palin would. That’s why the pick of a VP is not like McCain’s pick of what he’s going to have for dinner. The VP has to be ready at the drop of a hat to step in and lead the country and the world. Obama now has the confidence of the world, no matter what we think of him. That is a fact. But Raj, we’ve been down this road before. I keep dropping hints… Don’t you think you’d be happier sticking to the China threads?

October 1, 2008 @ 10:18 pm | Comment

There is no comparison with Obama because the man can speak. That is priority No. 1 – the ability to communicate. Having that ability in and of itself doesn’t make a person worthy of being president, but without that ability (along with others) it is impossible. The job is all about communication.

I would have thought the job is all about doing the right thing. Communication is important, but useless by itself.

Obama now has the confidence of the world, no matter what we think of him. That is a fact.

Absolutely, which is one reason why I would be glad of him winning the presidency. I just hope that the world does not blame him if they are disappointed with his policies/actions.

I keep dropping hints… Don’t you think you’d be happier sticking to the China threads?

I think we can discuss US politics in a friendly enough manner – right? Your views keep me thinking about what is for me another country’s political system – you’ve already got me off the fence and tentatively backing Obama, even if I am still not gloomy about the idea of McCain/Palin winning. By the end I might even be cheering him on.

October 1, 2008 @ 10:57 pm | Comment

Bottom line, and a point I was trying to emphasize but that you’re still not getting: You cannot be president without being able to communicate. Period. That is all. Did you notice I said above:

There is no comparison with Obama because the man can speak. That is priority No. 1 – the ability to communicate. Having that ability in and of itself doesn’t make a person worthy of being president, but without that ability (along with others) it is impossible.

I bolded the part you’re not absorbing. We are talking about speaking ability. Only that. Not experience. Not brains. Not anything else. The ability to answer a simple, polite question. That is all. Obama, McCain, Biden, myself and many other people can do this. Palin cannot. She cannot be president, ever. No matter what other marvelous attributes you or others (a fast-dwindling number) believe she may possess.

Wonderful to know I can still win friend and influence people, and that you are now enthusiastically backing Obama.

October 1, 2008 @ 11:08 pm | Comment

One thing I should point out re your previous comment. The title of this blog entry seemed as if you were inviting me to comment – I was more than happy to do so.

We are talking about speaking ability. Only that.

Yes, I know. You said that the job was ALL about communication. I said that I thought it was about doing the right thing.

But I tell you what, if Palin has a terrible debate with Biden I will be happy to say that she has missed the opportunity to convince me that she can communicate to the minimum standard (unless she somehow turns that around) and thus isn’t suitable as VP.

you are now enthusiastically backing Obama

Tentatively.

Words, mouth – kettle, pot, black. ;)

October 1, 2008 @ 11:19 pm | Comment

Who cares about some Brit backing Obama? The British and their incessant meddling around the globe for 500 years laid the foundation for most of today’s geopolitical problems: India/Pakistan, Palestine, Iraq, vitually the whole African continent, etc. For such a small island it’s amazing that the British have the audacity to stick their noses where they clearly don’t belong. Plus, look at what a disgraceful mess their national politics are in. Blair was a Bush butt kisser…..and Gordon Brown…..Gordon who?

October 2, 2008 @ 12:30 am | Comment

It’s all good fun.

http://chaon.blogspot.com/2008/09/switching-sides.html

October 2, 2008 @ 2:19 am | Comment

LOL. Chaon is one of my closest friends and one of the funniest people I know! The other day he posted this priceless line on my blog…

“I feel a great disturbance in the force, as if millions of Chinese had just had their feelings hurt…”

October 2, 2008 @ 10:08 am | Comment

“For such a small island it’s amazing that the British have the audacity to stick their noses where they clearly don’t belong”.

This would seem to imply that it’s OK for big countries to stick their noses where they don’t belong. Are you American, by any chance?

October 2, 2008 @ 1:13 pm | Comment

@City Sucker
“This would seem to imply that it’s OK for big countries to stick their noses
where they don’t belong…”

No. Only small ones allowed. Specially small crazy island countries. ;-)

October 2, 2008 @ 2:29 pm | Comment

Ok this was originally in the Washington Post, but I found it in The Aus:

“A GROWING proportion of US voters question Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin’s readiness for the job, according to a national opinion poll reported by The Washington Post.

The poll results came as the Alaska governor prepared to face Democrat Joe Biden in the only vice presidential debate before the November 4 election.

About half of all voters surveyed said they were uncomfortable with the idea of Republican presidential nominee John McCain taking office at age 72, and 85 per cent of those voters said Mrs Palin does not have the experience needed to be president, according to The Washington Post/ABC News poll.”

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24436377-12377,00.html
Apparently 40% of white evangelical protestants also feel she is not ready.

October 2, 2008 @ 2:57 pm | Comment

You all have to see the latest interview, which in this post is set alongside an interview with Biden on the same issue, Roe v. Wade.

I literally had to stop Palin’s interview, it became so embarrassing, so painful. McCain must feel sick beyond words when he realizes how tragic his error was. Multiple errors, really, that all came down to the one foundational mistake: abandoning his principles to make himself more appealing to the Republican base. I think he once actually had some principles, but there’s no sign of them anymore. Nowhere.

October 2, 2008 @ 4:59 pm | Comment

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