Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

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Hacked By AdGhosT

Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

Horrible » The Peking Duck

Horrible

I try  to present a nuanced picture of my host country. I try to highlight its successes and also the built-in prejudices China often faces, especially over emotional and complex issues like Tibet. I try to distinguish between different parts of the Chinese government, to make it clear I know the government (like most governments) is not categorically evil, that many bureaucrats are doing the best they can to improve a country that faces daunting problems. I try to point out the economic impact of China’s rise and the extraordinary success of Hu Jintao’s ruthless, pragmatic and daring foreign policy strategy, how he has managed to re-stack the deck, and not the way America would like.

So the reason for the boring and somewhat defensive preamble is that I just came across one of those sickening stories that brings back all the animosity I felt for the CCP back in 2002-3. I know this is almost certainly the fault of local officials in Guizhou and not the central party in Beijing. And it’s one of those agonizing stories that we keep hoping will stop appearing as local leaders realize they can no longer contain and keep secret their malfeasances. And still, the stories appear.

The cause for hope: at least we are reading about it and it has made the world headlines thanks to the Internet. The cause for anxiety is that these things are often hushed up and forgotten.

And I know, we killed American Indians and kept slaves in the US, and we supported eugenics and gave rise to the Ku Klux Klan. And I know China’s a great country and has a lot to deal with. But when any country allows what appear to be acts of barbarism like this to take place, the story has to be told.

______________

Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 86 Comments

Photos.

July 1, 2008 @ 9:23 pm | Comment

Mor, I think you’re being harsh. Some in the party are pigs, and many people here live rotten lives (not that unusual in this inhumane and brutal world). Most people here still seem to love their government and compare where they are today to where there were under Mao. Through our Western lens this can seem bizarre. Yet that’s the way it is.

About Modern China being “a joke.” I think some of it is, having seen how some domestic companies are “managed” in the old SOE tradition where sloth, waste and inefficiency are cherished. But…but… I’ve also seen some companies being managed in line with six sigma principles under ISO9001 standards and doing an amazingly good job, albeit usually with the help of foreign managers. But these black/white scenarios – they are almost always misleading. Nothing is ever so black and white.

No matter how much there is to complain about, 400 million or so were lifted from poverty since the Mao days. Not that the CCP deserves the credit for this, but it did happen “under their watch” and it’s not really so surprising that the government enjoys a high degree of support. No matter how rotten we say it is, as long as this support is so strong, the party is here to stay.

July 1, 2008 @ 9:37 pm | Comment

@richard
“Some in the party are pigs,”

And some of course not.

You can even find a “righteous among gentile” in an ex member of the Nazi party!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Righteous_Among_the_Nations

Sometimes there is no option for some people to join the party, for one reason or another.
That is intentional in such political systems.

But Joining the party, in such circumstances, does not make you automatically evil. Others things make you evil…

July 2, 2008 @ 12:24 am | Comment

“No matter how much there is to complain about, 400 million or so were lifted from poverty since the Mao days. Not that the CCP deserves the credit for this, but it did happen “under their watch” and it’s not really so surprising that the government enjoys a high degree of support.”

And 800 million were pushed into much deeper poverty. Well done!

July 2, 2008 @ 3:32 am | Comment

I don’t think the CCP wants to link the general corruption problems in china with the Dalai Lama or “clique”.

They do not want to run the risk that people will see through that tactic and realize that it is possible the riots in Tibet and incident in Weng’an have similar root causes.

They do not want these protests to become linked in the minds of the Renmin as being performed by people dissatisfied with failings and corruption of the government.

July 2, 2008 @ 4:02 am | Comment

The rule of law does not exist in China. Enforcement is arbitrary and left in the hands of corrupt, ignorant, untrained cadres or their lackeys. The lack of accountability to the governed by those that hold power is the crux of the matter. Defending the sad conditions of Chinese society and lawlessness under the guise of patriotism is lame. You need to have something to be proud of before you assert your pride. Building skyscrapers and manufacturing all of the world’s junk are not great accomplishments. Feeding, educating and providing health care to your own people in a free and open society are how a nation’s success should be judged. By those standards, China is a dismal failure and the US is mediocre at best.

July 2, 2008 @ 1:55 pm | Comment

i’m a Chinese.and i’m so sad to here your words.but some of them is true.i like my country,but it need two most important things ,fair and freedom.

July 2, 2008 @ 8:54 pm | Comment

Thanks for the comment Edison.

July 3, 2008 @ 12:24 am | Comment

There is already an indisputable fact that contradicts the original story: the dead girl’s uncle is not dead.

Initially when I read this blog entry, I had the almost same reaction as that of Richard. As things unfold, I just don’t know which side to believe.

July 3, 2008 @ 5:38 am | Comment

I’ve ben locked at work the past two days and haven’t been able to follow the story. If he turns out to be alive it obviously changes the entire story. It also says something about having a censored media where the lack of verifiable information creates rampant rumors that can lead to violence, something we see too often.

July 3, 2008 @ 8:27 am | Comment

It also says something about having a censored media where the lack of verifiable information creates rampant rumors that can lead to violence, something we see too often.

I agree. The Chinese official media sucks.

However, what does this say about AFP? Shouldn’t AFP use only verifiable information in their reports? Did they jump the gun? I mean, Again? Foreign reporters were not banned from reporting in Guizhou, why didn’t they go there and check the facts?

This says a lot about the Western media’s China reports. Based on my observation, about 60% of what they write is based on pure rumors and speculations. Reuters is the lesser of the three “evils.” AFP is the worst, just like their president. What’s wrong with the French these days?

The girl was not raped either. Her uncle is still alive, he was attacked. As to who attacked him, it’s still unclear, this is the key to the whole thing.

It turns out that HongXing is the most cool-headed person in this whole thread.

July 3, 2008 @ 10:27 am | Comment

Let’s see how AFP reported this:

The riots occurred Saturday in Guizhou province when protesters ransacked three government and police buildings after the girl’s uncle died from an alleged beating by police trying to stop him from protesting against the handling of the case, locals and Internet postings said.

The official Xinhua news agency said the riots had erupted due to “dissatisfaction” over the investigation into the girl’s death, but added no further details.

Pictures posted on Internet blogs showed several thousand people gathered in front of the Wengan county police station, its windows shattered and the building smouldering.
The Hong Kong-based Information Centre for Human Rights and Democracy said that over 10,000 people took to the streets in the protests, with up to 150 people injured in clashes with police.

The reporters scrupulously state all their sources and add that they are alleged. The article is transparent and fair. (How often do the CCP mouthpiece publications say glorious stories about the government and awful news about the Dalai Lama et. al. are “alleged”? Let me help with the answer: Never.) Did you see further down, where they said local officials wouldn’t answer their calls? Don’t blame the AFP if this article doesn’t tell the government’s side of the story.

AC, this is a great example of how you work: Instantly find a way to reverse the situation and put blame on the Western devils, never China (although it was nice of you to throw in the first line about how you agree Chinese media suck BUT…and then your usual script). You and Hong Xing deserve one another.

July 3, 2008 @ 10:37 am | Comment

I suspect many, many Chinese (including most of the CCP) would be terrified of the Blue Fairy. (You know, the fairy who turned Pinocchio into a real boy.) If you lied in front of her, your nose would grow longer and longer. I think if she ever visited China, the aggregate length of Chinese noses resulting from her lie-revealing magic would suffice to circumnavigate our solar system several times over.

Looking forward to the day when enough Chinese people would finally decide that the predicament faced by them (courtesy of the CCP of course) is so awful they’ve got nothing to lose, whereupon they’d stage another major people’s revolution, led by a hero who would be the answer to Andy Raynor’s post (#40 above). Of course, it would be possible that Western governments, fearing the consequences for their own economies, would decide that this wouldn’t do and therefore help the CCP to put the revolution down. Then we’d suddenly realise that the West is in fact perfectly on a par with China! 😀

Alternatively, the revolution migh push through, albeit at the cost of turning the Yellow River into a Red River, if you get what I mean. Then it would appear as if a new hope has finally dawned on China… until a couple generations later, when the new ruling powers will turn out yet again to be as rotten as the CCP. And so on ad nauseum.

Enough fantasising for one day.

July 3, 2008 @ 11:16 am | Comment

Please tell me, which of the following can be considered credible source?

“locals and Internet postings”, “Pictures posted on Internet blogs”, “The Hong Kong-based Information Centre for Human Rights and Democracy”, “Locals contacted by AFP by phone”, “locals said”, “one local who refused to name herself”.

They sure found a lot of sources to support the allegation, didn’t they?

When people read such report, they usually take these big news agencies’ word for it. And the result? Just read the comments in this thread, can you honestly tell me these commenters didn’t believe the allegation? And please read your original post, can you honestly tell me you didn’t believe the allegation?

I know this is almost certainly the fault of local officials in Guizhou and not the central party in Beijing. And it’s one of those agonizing stories that we keep hoping will stop appearing as local leaders realize they can no longer contain and keep secret their malfeasances. And still, the stories appear.

July 3, 2008 @ 11:35 am | Comment

When people read such report, they usually take these big news agencies’ word for it. And the result? Just read the comments in this thread, can you honestly tell me these commenters didn’t believe the allegation?

That’s because the big news agencies generally have credibility….something which Xinhua and any other mouthpiece for the thoroughly corrupt Chinese system doesn’t have. Without transparency, freedom and accountability nothing they say is credible. Just becuase the Chinese have been forced to live in their little box doesn’t make it right or desirable. It’s amazing the number of commenters that blindly continue to defend the indefensible. Perhaps it would be best if the rest of the world just isolated them once again, stopped buying their junk, stopped letting their students study, stopped letting their tourists roam the world. Then the Chinese could have the “great” country all to themselves and live “harmoniously.” Pathetic!

July 3, 2008 @ 2:19 pm | Comment

@not_a_sinophile
“Perhaps it would be best if the rest of the world just isolated them once again, stopped buying their junk, stopped letting their students study, stopped letting their tourists roam the world. Then the Chinese could have the “great” country all to themselves and live “harmoniously.””

That will be most unjust for CH people. Why make them pay for the acts of a minority who holds the rein of power and their acolytes?
They pay enough day by day. We only have to deal with the ravings of those that wittingly or not act like their lackeys.
We also only see from a comfortable distance their day to day life, but we do not have to suffer it. Do not bottled them up, that is what the hardliner wish

Hope that those in CCP who really care for their country (yes there are some) can keep pushing reforms for a open society and rule of law forward.

CH tourists , CH students and CH migrants are welcome here. And all in all do not refrain to buy from time to time CH goods, although I prefer made in EU. Some are not so shoddy, you know?, and I think more of the people who can get a job there thanks to them than of the “glorius” CCP.

Yes, they try to get their products through through law price, but if they just could promote their own brands they could move up the price ladder. But with the image CH is given just recently, it is going to be difficult to push high status CH brands here.

July 3, 2008 @ 2:44 pm | Comment

AC, what Not a Sinophile said above about credibility.

This article is in line with journalistic standards – state your sources, do all you can to verify what you hear. The government could have nipped this in the bud, if indeed the story is false. You may not think those sources are reliable, but the government leaves reporters with no choices when it refuses to be transparent. I give the reporter high marks for the way this story was told. If they were being dishonest or had an agenda, they could have simply said, “Informed sources say…” But no, they were very upfront that all they had to work with were second-hand reports and the Internet, and that government officials wouldn’t speak with them. You can blame them all you want, but you have no argument. The story may well turn out to be false, but the way the reporters wrote it, they are telling you they cannot guarantee the validity of their sources.

I, too, couched the post in languaqe indicating that I could not say for sure where the fault lay: “I know this is almost certainly the fault of local officials in Guizhou and not the central party in Beijing.” That is based on my knowledge of past violent events in China, but I leave room for other possibilities. Anyway, we won’t get anywhere with this….

July 3, 2008 @ 6:06 pm | Comment

what Not a Sinophile said above about credibility.

That’s a big strawman argument. I wasn’t defending anybody’s credibility.

You may not think those sources are reliable, but the government leaves reporters with no choices when it refuses to be transparent.

That’s no excuse for reporting rumors. The undeniable fact that so many people believed the story prematurely speaks for itself. People were misled because the report is misleading. It’s misleading because the reporter used a lot of unreliable information and innocent readers mistook them as facts. The undefendable in this case is that the reporter provided unreliable information which has been proven to be wrong.

That is based on my knowledge of past violent events in China,

Yeah, one man must be guilty because he has been guilty before, right? This is exactly what the problem is in this kind of reporting. A conclusion is already drawn, then you go look for evidence to support it, if you can’t find any credible evidence, rumor will work too. And this is exactly how so many myths about China were created, you know, like “thousands of students were killed in TAM square”, and “there was a bloody crackdown in Tibet on 3/14”.

Your speculation could very well be true, but one week after the incident, the facts are still not clear. To me, two key questions in this case have not been answered, why did the girl kill herself and who attacked the girl’s uncle? Shouldn’t we wait for the evidence first instead of speculating?

July 4, 2008 @ 12:06 am | Comment

correction:

… The indefensible in this case is that the reporter provided unreliable information which has been proven to be wrong

July 4, 2008 @ 1:18 am | Comment

@AC,

There is enough reports coming out now that we have a pretty good picture of what’s going on. Even the family’s own petition (translated on Fool’s Mountain) isn’t as outrageous as these reports in the overseas media, sourced directly to activist groups in Hong Kong.

I’m a little thankful most of the foreign press has basically ignored the issue; not nearly important enough compared to the “real” issuse like Hu Jia and Dalai Lama, of course.

The happen ending to this story here is the fact that two officials in the county are now sacked, and everyone else is being investigated by the provincial government.

July 4, 2008 @ 5:14 am | Comment

“The happen ending to this story here is the fact that two officials in the county are now sacked, and everyone else is being investigated by the provincial government.”

What is a “happen ending”, great master Tang Buxi CCTV? Why don’t you learn proper English, before you start patronizing us, Great Wanker Tang?

July 4, 2008 @ 6:59 am | Comment

AC, last time I’ll say it – the reporter said most of their sources were 2nd hand (rumors), even if that went over your head. When the government refuses to speak and when when you receive photos and videos of a city in flames, you need to file a story. If all you have is stuff from the Internet and people’s stories of what happened, you report it, telling your readers that this is all you have and that everything you’re hearing is alleged and not yet verified, and that the government refuses to say what’s going on. In your world, it would be better for the reporter to just forget it – don’t tell the world there is a major riot and a city in flames, because they don’t have all the details. Bullshit. You report what you’ve got and tell the readers you can only base the story on 2nd hand and/or online sources. Many of the early reports from the Big Earthquake were word of mouth and, in effect, rumor, and the media had every right to run those, telling readers who was being quoted. Maybe in you world the should have waited a few days to get the full picture. Seriously, you have no idea what journalism is. This doesn’t mean every rumor a reporter hears should be used. They have to apply judgment and common sense, asking themselves whether they’ve interviewed enough people to establish a pattern, whether the rumor appears to have some grounding in reality, etc. Then as the breaking news evolves you clarify. Look at all the early stories about 911 on that day. Anyway, this is Journalism 101, and I shouldn’t have to spoon-feed it to you.

Now let’s look at Tang’s well-researched and unarguable point that makes him really grateful: I’m a little thankful most of the foreign press has basically ignored the issue; not nearly important enough compared to the “real” issuse like Hu Jia and Dalai Lama, of course.

This, ladies and gentlemen, is what it means to be “ignored” by the foreign press.

Hmm, let’s see all those media who have not ignored the story:

CNN
Al Jazerra
Reuters
AFP
Guardian UK
Associated Press
CBC Canada
Dispatch (S. Africa)
Washington Post

Many hundreds of foreign media. Several of these did multiple stories. And you know something Tang? I would list out many, many more publications, but after scrolling to the third page of Google News hits, the server suddenly wouldn’t respond. How could this be?? Tell us, oh media scholar.

And yeah, we all agree, the media shouldn’t have reported the Hu Jia story. Blind activist framed and imprisoned – no story there. I would love it if you were my newspaper editor, helping separate the wheat from the chaff. I can just imagine what my paper would look like.

July 4, 2008 @ 7:53 am | Comment

I remember a similar case a couple of years ago. Girl who was working in a hotel as a maid, got murdered after being sexually assaulted by local bigwigs and rioting happened soon after. When I first read this I thought it was just a continuation of that story. It’s positive this is coming out in the media, but with 30,000 people involved and IM posts, I don’t see how it could have been covered.

On the issue about what this says about China. I would take the hopeful outlook, that China is improving. Unfortunately local officials still have too much power and do abuse it.

July 4, 2008 @ 10:41 am | Comment

Ray, agree with your conclusions – improvement, but a long way to go and unconscionable abuse of power by many local officials.

July 4, 2008 @ 11:29 am | Comment

Certainly don’t expect Tang to reply. He is far too busy fighting against Western media bias, dressed in a Superman costume with a gigantic “zhong” character in place of the big S.

July 4, 2008 @ 1:17 pm | Comment

“Unfortunately local officials still have too much power and do abuse it.”

No accountability, no surprise this things happens.

A media struggling to be more open, sometimes allowed sometimes not depending on the whims/interest of the powers that be, is an improvement.

Even more and more difficult to keep this things under the rug with modern communication technologies available to common people.

If suddenly 30000 town people show up at government building wit torches, surely there are more grievances than that single incident. People do not feel protected by the authorities who are supposed to serve them, rather abused by them, and have no easy way to protect themselves against them.

Sad to see that things are only tried to be solved when they really flare up.
Which other injustices have they committed until this last one?

July 4, 2008 @ 1:30 pm | Comment

““real” issuse like Hu Jia ”

Just the day before yesterday there was a reportage in German TV about Hu Jia where his wife appeared. As lawyer explained also the hair wired “law” they used to justify jailing him. Rule by law indeed!

Once again footage of the”VIP” treatment or her wife where shown, treatment courtesy of CH gov.
I have no words to express how deeply the behavior of the thugs with her, and the officials that allowed it, enraged me.
It may be a cultural difference… But that kind of behavior is not allowed here, no matter who exercise it… and it is quite dangerous to try it by anyone.

And that is one injustice we can see, how many other are we can´t see?

To CH Gov. If because your angst and prejudices you just cant help to put someone like her and in her situation under house arrest, and least treat her with some respect. I cannot imagine you could give worst image of CH by allowing or condoning such behavior.

And no, it does not work to isolate her and prevent no open media to get to her.
If with some public light you are able to do what you did, what would you be able to do without no public light at all to press her. What are you able to do with those that are no visible at all to public eyes?

If in CH some people are publicly shown by netcitizens, I would not mind to put as many photos and videos of those thugs action in the internet for their (world)public shame.

Only positive things I can say, is that at least something of what is going on is been (almost)openly reported.

Now, CCP, go a little step further and try to make some fixes, please. Good ones,I mean. Just with a little bit would be enough, it could do wonders for the success of OGame party you are so lavishly preparing and spend so much money so far.

If you really care about CH image, CCP, just try to make a little effort, and treat her(and others) with some respect, at least until the end of the games, it does not cost so much money. OK?

July 4, 2008 @ 2:12 pm | Comment

A similar story took place in 2000 when a young Peking University student was raped and murdered while waiting for a bus to return her to her dorm at PKU’s satellite campus (she had spent that day at the main campus in Haidian). The Chinese media had been ordered not to report the incident. However, overseas Chinese students read of the crime in U.S. newspapers and forwarded the story to friends in China, whereupon students at various Beijing universities began to share information, question the failure of local media to report the incident, and plan for a memorial service. True to form, Chinese authorities quickly shut down university internet chatrooms and warned students not to cause trouble. In the end, the story was never properly reported in the Chinese press, though Peking University students were finally allowed to hold a modest memorial service in their classmate’s honor.

At the time, the Chinese media’s handling of this incident stood in stark contrast to their handling of the murder of a female Chinese foreign student studying in Texas just a few months earlier (late 1999, I think). The specifics of THAT murder were reported quickly and in great detail.

July 4, 2008 @ 4:24 pm | Comment

The PKU student’s name was Qiu Qingfeng.

July 4, 2008 @ 4:34 pm | Comment

@hong
“True to form, Chinese authorities quickly shut down university internet chatrooms and warned students not to cause trouble. ”

Ah!… The differences between harmonic society and an “harmonized” society….

“At the time, the Chinese media’s handling of this incident stood in stark contrast to their handling of the murder of a female Chinese foreign student studying in Texas..”
Reporting about wrongdoing of foreign (real or alleged) companies, even whole countries (France, Japan), is a free fire zone for CH media most of the time.
You can even get allowed demonstration!
Glad to know that foreign companies/contries make a contribution to the right of CH people for freedom of expression, although somewhat one sided.
Do they get any tax/import rates reduction for that service? 😉

July 4, 2008 @ 7:20 pm | Comment

“Hmm, let’s see all those media who have not ignored the story:

CNN
Al Jazerra
Reuters
AFP
Guardian UK
Associated Press
CBC Canada
Dispatch (S. Africa)
Washington Post”

But Richard, don’t you know these are all heavily biased propaganda instruments of the CIA?

July 6, 2008 @ 3:51 pm | Comment

I think by saying the media “ignored” this news means that the media didn’t give much attention to it. They do report it, but they didn’t not give nearly enough attention to it than a Tibet or Hu Jia story. You can search China news with google and compare this story with any story about Tibet. I am not accusing the western media of being biased by the way. I am just clarifying Buxi’s point so it will be cheapened.
Also, why are you guys getting so offended when someone try to defend Chinese government? It’s as if CCP or its defenders/apologists did something horrible to you in the past. Even the Chinese which is the main victim of CCP don’t hate it as much as some of you guys. Don’t insult those of us who don’t think CCP is that bad by saying that we are brainwashed and incapable of making a point. Maybe we don’t like people complaining about China or its government just like you don’t like people complaining about the western media. Maybe that helps explain why even when the clearest distinction is made between the government and the Chinese people, some of us still choose to argue against you.
By the way, newest information is out on ESWN. I don’t think the local government did anything wrong in the handling of this ?suicide?, except on public relation and attempts to lock down information.

July 6, 2008 @ 4:31 pm | Comment

bw , you’ll find many views of the CCP here, some very critical, some less so, some even optimistic about they way they are handling things. Please give the link to the ESWN article you are referring to. I just went and looked at the site and there was an article about a Hong Kong reporter interviewing villagers, none of whom were eyewitnesses to the alleged crime though many of them had very strong opinions about it based on hearsay. Where is the information that leads you to believe the local government did nothing wrong? Thanks fior commenting.

July 6, 2008 @ 5:32 pm | Comment

richard, I am just saying I don’t understand the hostility against Buxi or AC or other defenders (not including Hong). The variety of opinion is of course good, but I don’t understand where did so much personal hate against them came from.

The article’s under brief comment section “Wang Jiao, Chen Guangquan and Liu Yanchao Meet The Press”. Those are the 3 suspect who were suppose to be related to local officials. It turns out that they are really children of farmers. Why would the local police try to cover for them? Their short detainment and release was following the laws that deals with such criminal cases. When no further evidence is presented to suggest that they are the killers, the police has to release them after getting a statement and detaining them for 12 hours. The 3rd autopsy conducted under the eyes of the victims family and some villagers shows the same result as the first two: Li Shufen was not raped. Now there are still some questions as to who beat the girl’s uncle and did Li’s friends pushed her down the bridge, but I don’t see how the local government handle it wrong, legally speaking.

July 7, 2008 @ 1:49 am | Comment

bw, I in now way hate Buxi – it’s simply that when someone makes a statement as a matter of fact I expect them to be able to stand by it. See the new post above about AntiCNN and how it works. That’s the kind of thing that frustrates me – but it doesn’t make me hate anybody. CCT (Tang Buxi) has always been welcome to comment here and I don’t hate him and never have. Sometimes we have strongly agreed with one another. So please don’t read to much into things. I think you also read too much into that Brief Comment article, pointing to it as thought it absolves the local official who, I believe,have since been dismissed.

July 7, 2008 @ 7:03 am | Comment

“It also says something about having a censored media where the lack of verifiable information creates rampant rumors that can lead to violence, something we see too often.”

The conflict on this thread is best summed up by your statement, Richard. People seeking news and information about China are largely forced to choose between the bleached, sanitized official media, the filtered lens of the Western media, and the wild frontier of the internet. Since the most effective antidote to internet rumor-mongering – a free and independent media – would have potentially fatal side effects on the CCP, the credibility gap will remain and we will continue to hear about more incidents like this one.

July 11, 2008 @ 2:06 am | Comment

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