Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

Hacked By AdGhosT

Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

China Law Blog on Kebab Boy » The Peking Duck

China Law Blog on Kebab Boy

Most interesting.

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Richard Burger is the author of Behind the Red Door: Sex in China, an exploration of China's sexual revolution and its clash with traditional Chinese values.

The Discussion: 117 Comments

“Though if low taxes and lack of capital restraints and independent judiciary were important for financial centers, the world’s biggest stock markets would be in the Caymans and Jersey instead of high-tax spots with lots of capital restraints like New York and London.”

Sorry to keep dragging this thread in a tangent but this PoV is just too wrong to let stand. The Caymans and Jersey are emerging financial centers, dimwit. The amount of operations that financial firms send to those places grows by the day, while the amount of financial work done in New York and London (as a proportion of global financial services) drops continuously. Indeed, the only place which has seen steady growth has been Hong Kong, a place with good rule of law (which I do thank the Brits for, so hats off to your countrymen, Raj) low taxes, and low capital restraints.

As for the question of why London and New York are still strong financial capitals, there are three reasons: inertia (self-explanatory), digitizing of the entire financial system (which lowers provincialism of the financial system) and the fact that most of those taxes and regulations came about AFTER, not before, those cities became centers of finance. Correlation does not imply causality.

October 31, 2007 @ 1:22 pm | Comment

Tom, I am getting really sick of your lies and this will be the last time I am going to bother responding to you.

I have stated America is a force for good, sometimes. I have also complained about America. I do consider myself a patriotic American (nothing wrong with that, is there?), but I certainly do not see America as perfect. I have never stated, nor do I believe, that economic engagement is always a force for good. Where do you even come up with this crap and why do you find it necessary to make stuff up rather than dealing with reality.

I find you a despicable and sick person and I am not sure whether to pity you or revile you, but I am sure that I am going to start ignoring you.

I see that nobody reads your blog, nobody cites to your blog, and nobody comments on your blog. Does that not tell you something?

Good day.

October 31, 2007 @ 2:59 pm | Comment

China Law Blog,

Tom is a Deadhead. I don’t think I need to say anything else. It works on many levels. “Peace and love and power to the people, man.”

*

November 1, 2007 @ 1:41 pm | Comment

As Matt can attest, Kebab Boy has a history of mucking up more than a few comments pages. Recently the 88s wrote a very interesting and well-researched entry on the bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade.

Comments for the 88s’ “On the Bombing of a Chinese Embassy.”

Instead of providing evidence for his views, Kebab Boy retreats to claims of access to “deep sources” whose anonymity must be honored (oh brother!). In his attempts at ruining the comment thread there, he was joined by commenter Haohan. Still, the comment thread is worth reading for the other voices there.

*

November 1, 2007 @ 2:03 pm | Comment

Jeffrey,

My best friend in college (we are still friends) was a deadhead so I don’t think that explains much. That was a fascinating post at the 88s. I just think we won’t really KNOW what happened there until the documents are released in a bit under 50 years.

November 1, 2007 @ 2:50 pm | Comment

People like Jeffrey are stupid enough to believe that a little effort put into google will reveal all hidden truths.

November 1, 2007 @ 3:00 pm | Comment

nh,

Are you not just reinforcing Jeffrey’s point regarding your unwillingness to use actual evidence?

November 1, 2007 @ 3:21 pm | Comment

China Law Blog,

Okay, the Deadhead slur was indeed a cheap-shot. I was just having a little fun. Back in the 80s I lived in San Francisco and was more than a little amused by the conversations I overhead between them.

About the 88s’ post, I too found it a great read because it brought together both the personal and the cultural — the different starting points between 88 and his Chinese wife. While he and his wife moved beyond those starting points, most citizens in each country viewed the event through their acquired understanding of how the world works.

Here’s my bottom-line on the topic:

The mass of Americans and Chinese relied on different sets of basic assumptions of how the world operates. For Americans, it wouldn’t make sense for our military to bomb an embassy of a nuclear power of China’s stature for no good reason. For Chinese, it makes sense that Americans, as world bullies, would want to give the Chinese a little punch on the nose, just to show them who’s boss. Those are beliefs and attitudes that have not been radiated with pulses of logic.

What makes sense to each group of people is different and, as Swift understood, it is very difficult to get people to use reason to analyze views that were not created with reason in the first place.

I guess we’ll be waiting a long time for Kebab Boy’s “deep sources,” right? Heh heh.

*

November 1, 2007 @ 11:30 pm | Comment

“What makes sense to each group of people is different”

NOT saying you are right or wrong because

your LOGIC is 1) a [particular] method of reasoning or argumentation. 2) appropriate cultural, legal, artistic, historical etc principles of reasoning applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (3) “My ways are not your ways.” (The Bible quoting the LORD GOD.)

This “as Swift understood, it is very difficult to get people to use reason to analyze views that were not created with reason in the first place,” however is geopolitical arrogance and intellectual ignorance.

Geopolitics: 1)a national policy based on the interrelation of politics and geography.
2). a Nazi (Updated Neo-con)doctrine that a combination of political, geographic, historical, racial, and economic factors substantiated Germany’s right to expand its borders and control various strategic land masses and natural resources.

I guess we’ll be waiting a long time for Kebab Boy’s “deep sources,” right?”

You’re Right. Kebab boy is but a boy blessed with an adult’s mouth cursed with an warped and underdeveloped brain.

November 2, 2007 @ 1:14 am | Comment

@richard,

I like how you put it,

“a matter of fact, as much as anything can be a matter of fact. On the other hand,”

there’re those which are “sloppy, presumptive and indefensible.”

Very well put, indded.

November 2, 2007 @ 1:27 am | Comment

@CLB

People like Jeffrey and CK need things put in front of them because they lack the ability to grasp what is intangible.

They’ve also become spoiled by search engines and Youtube and live by the idea that what can’t be found there doesn’t exist.

The ugly truth is that the big powers do occasionally throw real punches, the USS Scorpion may have been sunk by a Russian sub and did not sink due to a training accident, for example. And US and Russian special forces units did get engage in combat on Alaskan and Russian shores and islands.

If the liberal artsies in China blogosphere would rather use the bombing to debate “deliberate” vs “accidental” and everyone’s feelings about the matter, they are only short changing themselves from other possibilites and realities in the world.

November 2, 2007 @ 2:22 am | Comment

Chinese drug market unchecked, NYT

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/31/world/asia/31chemical.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

November 2, 2007 @ 3:51 am | Comment

LOL~ It’s Kebab Brain vs the living…..

“because they lack the ability to grasp what is intangible. They’ve also become spoiled by search engines and Youtube and live by the idea that what can’t be found there doesn’t exist.”
—vs—
“a matter of fact, as much as anything can be a matter of fact.

Bravo.

November 2, 2007 @ 9:02 am | Comment

CK, nice way to bow out gracefully. But you still lose.

November 2, 2007 @ 12:38 pm | Comment

This thread’s after all China Law Blog on Kebab Boy. Dude, You’re the man!
Therefore I Humbly bow to thee in retreat and accept my defeat, taking comfort in the fact I am on the side of the winning team patiently awaiting your cerebral growth process to restart or to your next and/or further endless defeats. Cheers 🙂

China is undeniably full of problems, but it is nevertheless a great great great nation.

November 3, 2007 @ 5:13 pm | Comment

Nah, simply a nation full of great, great problems.

November 4, 2007 @ 1:47 am | Comment

WOW

November 7, 2007 @ 3:47 am | Comment

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