Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos

Hacked By AdGhosT

Hacked By AdGhosT & Tayeb TN & bo hmid

 

 

 

 

 

close your eyes and listen Elfen Lied <3

Greets~:AdGhosT-- adel pro tn- Anonback Tnx - A_Ghacker - xvirus -Malousi Foryn - MaxKiller - Nexamos


Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/richardp/public_html/wp-content/wp-cache-config.php:77) in /home/richardp/public_html/wp-includes/feed-rss2-comments.php on line 8
Comments on: Sickness, Harassment and Suicide http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/ A peculiar hybrid of personal journal, dilettantish punditry, pseudo-philosophy and much more, from an Accidental Expat who has made his way from Hong Kong to Beijing to Taipei and finally back to Beijing for reasons that are still not entirely clear to him... Wed, 12 Apr 2017 16:34:31 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 By: Dan http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-193573 Thu, 31 Jan 2013 03:55:35 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-193573 Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. The more power we give to government, the more this sort of thing will happen.

]]>
By: Richard http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192727 Sun, 27 Jan 2013 04:43:35 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192727 Looks like their plan may have backfired.

Good article out today about this heartbreaking story: http://www.thenation.com/article/172380/government-persecution-aaron-swartz-bradley-manning

]]>
By: Goju http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192726 Sun, 27 Jan 2013 04:34:29 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192726 A law prof and US Supreme Court blogger at the Volokh.com site has been writing blistering criticisms of the prosecutors on this case. The general consensus is that this is a case of prosecutorial misconduct. MIT, where the articles Aaron published came from, also said at the very beginning that they did not wish to pursue any charges. I cannot see any reasonable purpose that was served by the actions of the US Attorney. Even as a case of trying to make Aaron an example to other hackers, it was way over what would be reasonable. My own personal suspicion is that the authorities may have believed Aaron was connected or knew other – more serious – hackers and wanted names and numbers. These are the tactics used by cops and prosecutors against organized crime and drug gangs to get a suspect to turn state’s evidence.

Various agencies have been targeting the Annonymouse group and they may have felt Aaron could give them an opening to identify and locate members of this group.

]]>
By: Richard http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192699 Sun, 27 Jan 2013 01:52:25 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192699 Agree with everything you say, but the way they threw the book at him, threatening him with charges that could land him in prison for 35 years if he didn’t cop a plea that would have branded him a felon for life and sent him away for six months — that was way too severe for a first-time offender in what was basically a victimless crime. Yes, JSTOR was technically a ‘victim” but they said they did not want to press charges at all! Having used JSTOR for my own research, by the way, I can attest to the fact that they charge way, way too much, especially since the authors of the works get nothing. That doesn’t justify stealing, but I think that’s part of what Aaron wanted to say, that the information should be free. He was physically and mentally unwell, and I think you may be right about abandonment. But looking at the timing, I don’t think he would have killed himself if the prosecutors had taken a more humane approach. I don’t know what I’d do if I were told I had to go to prison for six months and live the rest of my life as a felon.

]]>
By: Goju http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192500 Sat, 26 Jan 2013 06:02:39 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192500 Kind of ambivalent on this myself. JSTOR does have the right to protect its property, but much of that property was actually created by others and stored by JSTOR. This is entirely legal. Aaron chose a method he had to have known was illegal to accomplish something he believed in. Breaking the law has consequences. When you step over that line, you need to understand what can happen and be prepared to deal with it. From what I have read, Aaron was an idealist and may have believed that other – more powerful – people would see the rightness of his beliefs and rise to his defense. My own personal opinion is that his suicide was more from a sense of abandonment.

]]>
By: Richard http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192196 Sat, 19 Jan 2013 17:15:32 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192196 I think it’s a combination, as do his friends who knew him well. He committed suicide only days after being told the only agreement the prosecutor would offer would be six months in jail and having to live as a convicted felon for the rest of his life. For a good perspective see this excellent analysis by the famous academic Lawrence Lessig.

]]>
By: yamabuki Zhou http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192179 Sat, 19 Jan 2013 04:29:29 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192179 In my opinion, Mr Swartz’s suicide was much more related to his deep problem with depression, rather than his legal problems. Depression that leads to suicide is an extreme mental state. To blame Mr. Swartz’s suicide on his legal problems does not really seem appropriate. Proper studies in science do not recognize a causal link between associated events.

I doubt that a troubled soul like Mr. Swartz even knew why he killed himself. Suicide is such an extreme act, we are as helpless as the victim of suicide to understand why it happens.

Further, if we accept the reality of the soul, then we have no basis to judge at all, since the realities of the soul and spirit are beyond our comprehension.

yamabuki

]]>
By: justrecently http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-192083 Thu, 17 Jan 2013 14:16:10 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-192083 Mr. Swartz – like many others – would have needed critical solidarity. There is no need to believe in them, but there is a need to see their rights, and to see the infringements on their rights. There are many of Mr. Swartz’ kind, and they go completely unnoticed. When I wrote about Deutsche Welle‘s Chinese service, and published this interview, I kept in mind that while the judicial system doesn’t always amount to justice, the main problem – probably – is general apathy.

I see a parallel between this case, and China – and I think I can afford to point this out without being considered a CCP apologist. Obvious abuse of state power (if in a legal sense, remains to be seen, but clearly abuse in an ethical sense) leads to flaring tempers both in America and in China. It is a universal experience – most people can relate to it in one way or another. But these moments are rare.

One news agency in Germany – an agency with an official church background – published a long report, with a lot of verification in favor of the four journalists that had been sacked. Not one single paper or broadcaster in Germany cared to air it. Noone cared to demand coverage, either. The report was apparently available to all the German press, in a common database. So there is no reason to believe that they were unaware of the story. Unfortunately, the story didn’t go online. It was sent to me as a pdf file.

Their problem, as I interpret it: their industrial-relations and journalist issues ware a sensitive issue all over the commercial (and publicly-owned) media. Hence no interest in covering it.

As long as the big papers don’t cover a story, it won’t have happened. The traditional media are still the gate-keepers for politically relevant information. That’s where questions about your trade (not you personally, to be clear) need to be asked, Richard.

There are a few “beacons” in public awareness, like Julian Assange or Bradley Manning. Their merits and mistakes, in my view, would need to be debated extensively, rather than simply be praised or condemned. They seem to serve as some post-modern kinds of Jesuses-on-the-cross. People pay their respects to them as they do to Brian, as he hangs on the cross in that great Monty-Python movie, and then go back to their routines.

That kills every issue. When “Jesus” is in charge, you don’t need to do anything. When Assange and Manning are saints, you can’t live up to their example anyway. Only a society that is prepared to look into the shades of grey, to judge, and to decide what to do, can become a more fair society.

It is right to mourn Mr. Swartz. But the main question is: how to handle the issue? It’s a question to society. To get either careerist or politicized prosecutors fired – guys who were not obliged to prosecute, but did it anyway -, would be a beginning. It wouldn’t only be an achievement for those who make it into the headlines, but also for the many who go unnoticed, in their neighborhoods, and nationwide. Power needs to learn to respect the “common people”.

That’s why I maintain that the main difference between China and most Western country isn’t about human rights. It is about totalitarianism. Our press isn’t controlled centrally, but business principles control it anyway. We can speak out, provided that what we say is backed by evidence, but too many people who matter won’t speak out. That’s when things start going into the wrong direction, even in democratic countries. Democracy is nothing static. It can rot, if it isn’t defended against enemies from within (who frequently like to present themselves as democracy’s greatest champions).

Here is another problem: networking. It’s another field where Western countries are becoming more similar to China. The law is becoming unpredictable here, given the technicalities. You can twist every paragraph – or any well-paid lawyer can – until it fits the interests of the powerful.

When torture becomes something you can advocate in a European paper without becoming a pariah in your own established network, things are going wrong.

If our fundamental rights matter as much to us as our economic prospects do, it’s time to go from mourning to action, however small. Just as meditation is a skill one needs to learn, awareness for the small, but important things one can do in the real world, can be learned, too.

]]>
By: The Clock http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-191916 Tue, 15 Jan 2013 02:50:25 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-191916 A lot of 50 centers try to use this to attack the democratic system of America. In America, there’s something called copy right protection, which the CCP-ruled China doesn’t have.

He died a happy man knowing he lived in a law-based society.

]]>
By: The Clock http://www.pekingduck.org/2013/01/sickness-harassment-and-suicide/comment-page-1/#comment-191914 Tue, 15 Jan 2013 02:45:24 +0000 http://www.pekingduck.org/?p=11304#comment-191914 At least he’ll be happy to know he suffered a democratic depression and died a democratic suicide.

Death to the CCP!

]]>